Tag Archives: safety

Project ChildSafe Celebrate 20 Years of Leading the Way on Genuine Firearms Safety

As Project ChildSafe, the nationwide firearms safety education program of the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, it’s stepping up efforts with the shooting sports industry to remind gun owners of their important role as leaders in genuine firearms safety.

“Nearly 9,000 retailers, gun ranges, makers of accessories and conservation groups, along with many of the nation’s largest firearms manufacturers, have joined us in spreading the message of ‘Own It? Respect It. Secure It.,’ and encouraging gun owners to store their firearms responsibly when not in use,” said Steve Sanetti, NSSF’s CEO. “With new companies in our industry adding their support for Project ChildSafe, I know we can continue to reduce firearms accidents, thefts and misuse, including suicide.”

Project ChildSafe was launched in 1999 and has become the largest, most comprehensive firearms safety education program in the U.S. Through partnerships across the shooting sports industry, as well as with more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies, the program has distributed more than 38 million free firearms safety kits — each including a gun lock and safety brochure–to gun owners and become the leading voice in promoting safe storage of firearms when they aren’t in use.

The program is financially supported by NSSF member companies, and during its history has received a number of federal and state grants helping to extend its reach. At the industry’s annual trade show this week, the SHOT Show, program leaders are focused on increasing direct industry engagement with customers and the gun-owning public to promote safe firearms handling and storage. The effort is primarily driven by the results the program has already achieved. In the time since Project ChildSafe launched, fatal firearms accidents in all age groups have dropped to historic lows, according to the National Safety Council. Additionally, in 2017, the Government Accountability Office issued a report with a clear determination that giving gun owners free gun locks, as Project ChildSafe does, results in more gun owners choosing to use the locks and store their firearms securely.

Sanetti said that there are many safe storage options gun owners can use to keep guns out of the wrong hands, including lock boxes, and that parents should make it a priority to talk with their children about gun safety.  “The firearms industry is committed to the safe, legal and responsible use of firearms, and, as an industry, we are the leading voice in the national conversation to promote responsible actions among legal gun owners, to help prevent accidents and to help keep guns out of the wrong hands. Because all those actions are real solutions that make homes, neighborhoods and communities safer,” Sanetti said.

NSSF’s Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show presents a perfect opportunity for industry members to learn more about Project ChildSafe and how they can be involved. Project ChildSafe will be on site at the 2019 SHOT Show in booth #2426 and, because mobilizing an industry also requires engaging the leading voices in that industry, Project ChildSafe will host a special “Women of the Gun” reception, on Wednesday, Jan. 23, featuring many of the most prominent women in hunting and the shooting sports today.

For more information on Project ChildSafe and how to get involved, visit projectchildsafe.org

 

About NSSF

The National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 12,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers. For more information, visit nssf.org.

 

About Project ChildSafe

NSSF launched Project ChildSafe in 1999 (prior to 2003 the program was called Project HomeSafe) as a nationwide initiative to promote firearms responsibility and provide safety education to all gun owners, young adults and children. Through partnerships with more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies nationwide, the program has provided more than 38 million free firearm safety kits to gun owners in all 50 states and the five U.S. territories to help prevent firearms accidents, theft and misuse. That’s in addition to the more than 70 million free locking devices manufacturers have included with new firearms sold since 1998 and continue to do today. Project ChildSafe was also recognized as one of three finalists in the National Safety Council’s 2018 “Green Cross for Safety” Awards. Learn more at projectchildsafe.org.

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Filed under How To, safety, Shooting, shot show

Test Fire Tool for Gunsmiths, Shot Show 2013

Bullet Bunker is a product that I first saw at the 2012 Shot Show.

Bullet Bunker

Bullet Bunker

This is a clean and safe alternative to the common sand bunkers many gunsmiths build for themselves.  If you have ever used a home-made, or the fun spelling (homade), bullet trap you know they are effective but usually dirty. and they lead dirt and dust all the time.

The bullet bunker is a cost effective answer that also allows for accuracy testing as well as simple test firing.  This year the bulletbunker.com

is introducing 8 new models.  The bullet bunkers are available for use with calibers as large as 375 H&H.  They can also handle full auto fire.  There is even a digital target system available as well as more conventional paper target systems for fast target changes.

I gotta get me one of these!

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Filed under ammo, bullets', Firearms, Gunsmithing

Five Things that go wrong with guns on opening weekend.

If you have ever been hunting you know that there is a reason it’s called ‘hunting’ rather than ‘getting’. It’s inevitable that things go wrong. Thinking back, I remember vehicles getting stuck, flat tires, forgotten equipment, and much more.

There is one constant in the universe. No matter how well you plan, something unexpected will always happen. Especially when you’re going into the back country and can’t just run to the store to get something.

For hunters the problem is often that surprises with their gun are the game stoppers. There are a few common problems that you should check for before you leave on your back country trip. A few of them can be solved in the field. We will talk about both and how to best deal with them.

1. Stiff or sticky action. You would be amazed how often a gunsmith gets in a gun with the complaint that it will not cycle.

Solution: Nine times out of ten its just dirty and dry. The quick fix, use a product like Powder Blast™ from Break Free™ to blow out the dirt and dried lubricant. (This type of cleaning removes all oil and can damage finish on stocks.) That’s right oil can dry out, it becomes like a varnish coating parts and making them stick so they do not slide past one another properly. Don’t forget to oil when your done cleaning. You should have sighted in your gun before heading to the field, then you would have caught this problem at home.

2. Horse or 4 wheeler rolled on your gun.

Solution: This can be a game stopper for more than one reason. First, inspect carefully to see if the barrel is bent. If the scope is obviously damaged, it might still shoot OK, find a place, preferably away from your hunting area to test the scope. (You will have to shoot to see if it’s still sighted in.) This is one time that iron sights can be a life saver. You can prepare for this ahead of time by selecting scope mounts that allow you to easily remove the scope with either minimal or no tools. See thru scope mounts are a compromise to allow you to see iron sights at the same time as the scope, I avoid them at all costs.

3. Safety sticking, either on or off.

Solution: If you already in the field, the best fix is a little lube on the safety or trigger where the parts interact. Work the safety on and off many times to see if the problem solves itself. An empty chamber is the only safe answer if the problem persists. Safeties are only a mechanical device and should never be trusted to keep the gun from firing. (Safe gun handling rule: Never allow your muzzle to cross anything you do not want to destroy.) Obviously, if this happens during prep for the trip, take the gun to a gunsmith, or take the time to make sure the problem is fixed.

4. Accuracy has evaporated, can’t hit the broad side of a barn. You pull down on that 1000 pound 14 point buck at 75 yards and totally miss him. Later you take a poke at a doe at 50 yards and miss.CC copyright Bill Ebbesen

Solution: In the field, switch to iron sights, or a different gun. Many hunters keep a spare gun in the truck “just in case”. First chance you get, hit the range and check your scope for accuracy and to see if it’s still sighted in. Either you will prove the gun is OK or you will find out you had buck fever. Scopes can go bad without notice, if your scope fogs up, then assume it is time to replace it or send it in for service. It is possible that some other factor is causing accuracy issues, ie check the trigger guard screws to make sure they are tight, and check the muzzle for damage. Cracked stocks can cause sudden changes in accuracy or point of impact as well. Copper fowling of the barrel can cause accuracy problems too, take care of this before the season.

5. Misfires.

Solution: Many possible causes. First look to see if the firing pin is leaving a mark on the primer. Remove the firing pin assembly from the bolt, clean it and the firing pin tunnel to make sure there is not powder, brass, or other blockage. Some guys think if a little oil is good that more is better. Not true, just a drop or two of oil on the firing pin is normally all you need. Too much oil can become thick enough in cold weather to cause a misfire.

Clearly this is a fairly general list. What it points out more than anything else is that preparation is the best way to avoid problems. Another thing that jumps out is the need for some simple tools in your field kit. A set of screw drivers and a field cleaning kit can take care of a surprising number of simple problems.

Good Hunting!

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Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, hunting, Rifles, Sights/Scopes, tools