Tag Archives: rimfire

Winchester Rifles for SHOT Show 2014

Single shot fans will be happy to see that Winchester is offering the low wall Model 1885 in 22 LR, 22 Win. Mag., 17 HMR, and 17 WSM.  The low wall action has been popular with single shot fans ever since Winchester put it into production over 100 years ago.  While these new models are slightly different from the original design, they still provide good quality guns with out the collectors price tag.

Other offerings for this year include the 1873 with a color cased action.  A 20″ barrel, and full length magazine tube  bring back the “Load on Sunday and shoot all week” era in a fun and historic way.  Chamberings are 44-40 and 45 LC.  Stocks are straight grip walnut.

1892 lever guns are in the mix as well.  Large loop levers make you think of John Wayne and True Grit.  These rifles have full length magazines along with 20 inch barrels.  Calibers are 357 Magnum, 44 magnum, 44-40, and 45 Long Colt.  All finished with high polish blueing.

Cowboy action shooters will be glad to see this line up.

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17 Winchester Super Magnum (Rim Fire)

This may be the only new cartridge at the 2013 SHOT Show.  Winchester’s new 17 caliber rim fire is an attempt to capitalize on the success of the 17 HMR.  I will be challenged on that point, so lets try and answer that challenge right here.  The 17 HMR has had reasonable success because it was intended to put 17 caliber cartridges in the hands of shooters without the need to reload.

17 Winchester Super Magnum

17 WSM (RF) vs 17 HMR

Obviously there are some center-fire cartridges in the marketplace that address these shooters as well.  The 17 Remington Fireball and the 17 Remington are substantially bigger cartridges.  Being center-fire generally means more expensive firearms too.

The advantage of rimfire is lower cost ammunition and lower cost firearms as well.  The only two models chambered for the new Winchester Super Magnum at SHOT Show in 2013 was one rifle from Savage Arms, and the model 1885 low wall from Winchester.

Winchester lists three loads for the new rim-fire cartridge.

  • S17W20, Polymer Tip, 20 gr. bullet, 3000 fps
  • S17W25, Polymer Tip, 25 gr. bullet, 2600 fps
  • X17W20, JHP, 20 gr. bullet, 3000 fps

At about 600 fps faster than the HMR the 17 WSM  has a about half the drop with the same bullet weight.  For more information see: http://winchesterproductdemos.winchester.com/17WinchesterSuperMagnum.html#/Home

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How To: Update an old 10-22, Part IV

This is what the finished forend tip looks like.

Our goal for this post.

I did not like the stubby looking forend as it was after I cut the stock off and made the filler insert shown in the last installment of this How-to.   I rounded up some scrap wood and compared them to the stock to see what I liked best.  I could have used black walnut, english walnut, myrtle, or maple none of them looked good next to the laminate of the stock.  I had a scrap of black and gray laminate left over from a stock I made for a client.  It had the best look of all the samples I held up, just my opinion.

Because of the shape of the stock I felt it best to keep the forend cap short and shaped to match the overall look of the stock.  Of course much of that can be a matter of personal taste.  There are style and form rules for classic rifle stocks, but thumbholes ignore all those rules.  Consequently I was not afraid to make a cap that was different than your used to seeing.

rough forend tip installed on stock.

Shaping of the new tip underway.

Started by sanding the beveled cut on the stock smooth so that there would not be any noticeable gaps in the joint between the cap and the stock.  I put the blank to be used for the cap on the belt sander and removed all the saw marks as well.  Then position the blank to make sure it will provide wood where you need it for the forend cap.

It’s not unusual for the joint surfaces to have a little rounding that would cause a large gap between the two pieces of stock material.  My solution to this is to use a chisel to undercut the stock face leaving just 1/8″ of material at the edges for a tight glue joint.

rouphing out the barrel channel

Scraping out the tip to match the barrel channel in the stock.

Once the epoxy is set it’s time to cut off any excess material and prepare to shape the new tip.  Be sure to leave enough material to get the shape your after, it’s easier to cut more off than to put it back, trust me.  You will note above that we taped off the stock, this is to minimize any chance of damage to the finished stock as I do not plan to refinish the whole stock if I can avoid it.

Shaped and inlet for the barrel.

First coat of finish on.

Chisels, rasps, files, and hand sanders are the standard tools for the shaping of the new forend tip.  Work the shape down to match the existing lines of the stock, since we don’t plan a total refinish we are careful to get close and then file down the last little bit with fine files.  Then switch to 180 grit sand paper to finish the shaping.  By taping the stock with painters masking tape you can sand very close if your careful.  When doing the final blending of the lines tape the stock about 1/2″ back from the joint and carefully sand with 320 paper.  I was cautious at this point not to cut all the way through the stock finish.  Then switch to 400 grit paper, remove the tape and gently blend the sanding lines.

Custom updated 10-22 carbine stock.

Here is the final profile of the forend tip from the side.

Revolution stock was donated by Brownells for this project.

Bottom view of the stock with the new tip on and finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will start refinishing the receiver and other parts in the next segment.   We will also install some aftermarket parts and let you know if there are any tricks you need to learn.  How about a trigger job on the existing 10-22 parts?

Read On: How to Update an Old 10-22

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How To: Update an old 10-22, Part III

Stock is cut to match the new McGowen 10-22 drop-in barrel.

Above is the forend of the stock right after I cut it off.  As mentioned in an earlier post the barrel did not look good with the stock at factory length.  The disadvantage is that under the barrel channel there is a cut that was put there mainly to lighten the stock.  As a result I now have a gap under the barrel that looks pretty bad.

Right away I looked at two solutions to the gap under the barrel.  First is to use a piece of the forend that we just cut off to make a plug for the hole. This gap under the barrel needs to be filled to make a professional looking job of it.

File the insert to shape.

You can see that I cut out a small plug to fit the hole under the barrel.  I was careful to select a piece that could be aligned with the layers of the laminate.  Then by hand filing the plug you can fit it carefully so that it lines up with the grain, or laminate in the stock.  A tight fit is important if you wish to minimize the line left when the plug is glued in place.

Below is the plug after some fitting.  Note that the gaps around the edges are minimal and will seal up tight with glue.Plug is carefully matched to the space it is inlayed into.

This is one option.   Another is to make a forend cap or tip similar to what is common on sporter style stocks.  That will be our next installment.

Read On: How to Update an Old 10-22, Part IV

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