Tag Archives: Remington

Remington Agrees to Replace Triggers

Remington has manufactured millions of rifles on the basic Remington 700 pattern over the years (about 7.85 million by one report).  At least two class action law suits are included in this settlement filed in Federal Court.  Settlement announce December 5th, 2014.

The settlement covers the Model 700, Seven, Sportsman 78, 673, 710, 715, 770, 600, 660, XP-100, 721, 722 and 725.  Any person who owns one of these rifles may if they so choose have the trigger replaced by Remington.

In Remington’s Quarterly report to investors in September of 2014, Remington revealed it had set aside $29.7 million in what the company called a “Model 700 settlement reserve.”

Watch the CNBC report: Remington 700 triggers to be replaced.

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Savage Offers New Model Axis II XP, Shot Show 2014

Axis XP

This new variation on the Axis XP features the AccuTrigger, which is adjustable from 2.5 to 6 pounds.  The rifle will come with a Weaver Kaspa scope mounted and bore sighted.  This is a 3-9×40 variable scope.

Barrels are 22 inches, matte blue on all metal surfaces.  The stock is a black molded synthetic.  A detachable five rounds magazine rounds out the package.  Eight calibers from 223 to 30-06 are offered.  MSRP is only $415

Axis barrels can be changed out just like the popular Savage 110 type barrels.  In fact our friends at 4D Reamer Rentals LTD. tell us that the barrels are interchangeable.  4D offers Savage pre-fit barrels in more calibers than any other maker we have found. So you can swap the barrel on one of these rifles and have the caliber of your dreams.

Rumor has it that 4D will be introducing a new barrel nut wrench, at the SHOT Show, for Savage smooth barrel nuts, like those found on the Axis series of rifles.

Finally, Savage is offering Youth models on the new Axis II XP series.  These rifles will have a 20″ barrel chambered for 243 Winchester.  Two camo patterns will be offered:  A woodland pattern and the very popular “Muddy Girl”.

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Browning X-Bolt Eclipse Hunter, SHOT Show 2014

Browning X-Bolt

X-Bolt Eclipse Hunter from Browning as the name suggests is a bolt action.  It features a matte blue finish on the barrel and receiver.  Mounted in a gray laminated wood thumb-hole, monte carlo style stock, the barrel is free-floated.  The magazine is a detachable rotary design.

Other features include an adjustable trigger and 60 degree bolt lift.

Calibers available for 2014:

  • 243 Winchester
  • 7mm-08 Remington
  • 308 Winchester
  • 25-06 Remington
  • 270 Winchester
  • 30-06
  • 7mm Remington Magnum
  • 300 Winchester Magnum
  • 300 WSM
  • 270 WSM

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Colt Adds to the M2012 Line-up, SHOT Show 2014

Colt 2012 in 260 Remington

In conjunction with Cooper Firearms of Montana, Colt, is expanding the M2012 bolt action rifle family with the introduction of two new models. The M2012MT308T and M2012LT308G/M2012LT260G.

 “The durability and accuracy provided by the M2012 bolt action rifle family is outstanding,” said Joyce Rubino, Vice President of Marketing for Colt. “These new ‘crossover’ rifles transition easily from target shooting at the range to long-range hunting in the field.

All M2012 models feature a custom fluted, match grade barrel and a single stage, adjustable Timney trigger. A signed, serial numbered and dated test target is included with each rifle as a testament to its accuracy.  The new variations are available in 260 Remington as well as 308 Winchester.

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Life is Too Short for Ugly Bolt Handles

Ugly Bolt HandleUgly Bolt handles are common on “sporterized” rifles from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s.  Fewer gunsmiths forge bolt handles these days than they used to.  Forging is the process of heating and bending a military bolt handle to create something more like a commercial gun for sporting use might have. 

The main reason for forging a bolt handle is to make it work with a scope.  Military bolt handles are often straight or have a 90º downward bend.  This works fine for a military rifle with iron sights, not so great with a scope.

Once the bolt handle is forged into the new shape it must be filed and cleaned up to have an aesthetically pleasing look.  However, many hobby smiths or guys who are new to the business are not clear on how to do this work and make it look nice.

Some military bolt handles are a little short for forging.  A good gunsmith will notice this and will either weld in an extension to make the handle longer, or replace the handle with a better design.

There are several choices for bolt handles in the market place, some are easier to work with than others but they can all produce a nice functional handle with an attractive appearance.  Some require more shaping and forming than others.

Dakota bolt handles are the easiest I have found to work with and consistently get an attractive finished product with a reasonable amount of work.  They are available in 5 different styles.

  • 2 raised panelDakota Bolt Handles
  • 3 raised panel
  • Universal/Mauser
  • Winchester
  • Remington

Raised panel bolt handles are used by engravers or gunsmiths who want checker the knob of the bolt handle. The raised area makes it easier to checker the knob.

The Universal/Mauser handle is designed to weld onto the square root of a military bolt after the original handle has been cut off.  These are very popular and produce a nice looking finished product when the welds are cleaned up and all the lines are blended. 

Winchester style knobs emulate the pre-64 Winchester style bolt handle.  They have a large flat base that can be adapted to many types of bolts.

Remington style knobs have a base the can be silver soldered onto a Remington bolt to replace the factory knobs that many shooters would prefer to replace.  The styling of the knob on these handles is more round with a straight shaft, as apposed to the factory design which is oval and has a dog leg in the shaft.  These knobs are not checkered.

Mauser Bolt Handles Finished

All styles arrive “as cast”.  They are made from good quality steel that blues nicely when finished.  They can also be polished to a nice bright finish if that is your preference.

Jig for bolt welding

How to hold the bolt handle for welding. Notice the heat sink in the back of the bolt used to protect the threads during welding.

 

Since forged handles are often a little short the welded replacement also solves this problem.  Anyone practiced at both methods c

ould probably do either in the same amount of time, but the for my money the welded replacement just seems like less work for the result you get.

Dakota bolt knobs are available from http://www.4-dproducts.com.

 

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Hornady Brings 300 H&H Back!

Hornady ammunition will bring the 300 H&H back from the dead for 2009. 

The loading will be a 180 grain Hornady InterBond TM bullet.  This bonded core bullet will perform well in the 300 H&H.  Around the time that the Short Magnum craze took off a few years back the gun manufacturers all dropped the old school 300 H&H.  It required a long action, the standard 300 Winchester could equal the H&H with a Medium length action, and of course the new WSM & RSAUM cartridges were able to nearly duplicate the same ballistics from a short (308 length) action. 

Non of that has changed, so why in Hornady bringing back this dinosaur?  Well, the answer is pretty simple, this caliber was the 300 Magnum for the better part of 40 years when the 300 Winchester arrived on the scene and the H&H continued to be offered by various factory gun makers up to about 2000.  Since then it has been purely a custom offering, being offered by gunsmiths everywhere.  To make a long story short, there are a lot of guns out there hungry for factory ammo in 300 H&H so Hornady is filling that need.

Hornady's new 300 H&H loaded with a 180 grain bullet.
Hornady’s new 300 H&H loaded with a 180 grain bullet.

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