Tag Archives: custom stock

New from 4D Reamer Rentals, SHOT Show 2014

Grip Cap Inserts

Left to Right, Antique Ivory, Ivory and Black Linen

4D seems to always be looking for new products to serve the gunsmith.  They are known for renting tools to the trade, but did you know they offer many products for sale too?

For some time they have been offering Dakota grip caps and bolt handles to their customers.

Their newest introduction are inserts for Dakota skeleton grip caps.  At present they are only available for the radiused version of grip cap.  The first run is made up of several types or Mycarta.  The idea is to offer a product that saves the gunsmith valuable time and still offers a quality and value added service for the client.  Mycarta is a fully resinated material that is water proof, it is often used on custom knives for handles because of it’s durability.

grip cap inserts

Easy way to provide a classy look.

These inserts cut the time required for inletting one of these skelotonized caps to a stock.  Many clients like the idea of adding a different touch that make the rifle unique to them.  The two lighter colors show here mimic ivory without extreme expense.  Layers of paper in the mycarta give the effect of the grain you normally see in ivory.  Mycarta can be skrimshawed to further customize the cap.  Easy way to provide a classy look.

4D plans to offer other materials depending upon customer requests.  Walnut is an obvious choice.  Often these inserts are checkered and these material lend themselves well to checkering.

finished insert

Below is a finished black linen mycarta insert, just to show what the finished product can look like.  There really is no limit to what can be done with these inserts.  Cool custom touches really make a rifle special, and this is definitely a custom touch.

4D is debuting these inserts just in time for SHOT Show, but we get to tell you about it here first.

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Classic Rifle Stock Drawings & How to Use Them

A while back I mentioned a book by Alvin Linden and then a set of Classic Rifle Stock Drawings that are currently available.  The interest in these posts has been high, so this is meant to expand on the previous posts.   What I have posted below is the instructions from the CD on American Classic Rifle Stocks.  I think they will give you some insight into the drawings on the CD and on top of that there are some useful bits of information you can use even if you don’t have the drawings.  Enjoy.sample stock drawing

How to use the Drawings:

These Drawings were assembled to define the parameters of the “American Classic” hunting stock.  Many of the stocks made by novices and even some professionals lack the aesthetics that should be afforded a nice piece of wood.  Worse yet, they are left too large, or cut down too small, either of these conditions will make a stock that has poor handling characteristics and may even add to the felt recoil.  A properly designed stock

Improves handling, reduces felt recoil, and is pleasing to the eye.  It is not our intention here to teach you stock making.

How These Drawings Evolved:

Normally drawings are very specific about dimensions, and tolerances are very tight, not so with these drawings.  You will see that there is a range of dimensions for most measurement.  The reason for this is simple, no two shooters are alike, so you need to be able to adjust the dimensions for the shooter.  Also magnum guns are generally built heavier than standard caliber guns to help control recoil.  The dimensions included here were derived by measuring about 100 stocks from various custom makers, some names you would recognize and some you might not.  So the ideas represented come from a broad cross section of custom stock makers, not just the opinion of one maker.

How do I decide which dimensions to use?

The Caliber of the rifle, and the size of the barreled action will be a major factor in this decision.  A light caliber like 243 Winchester with a sporter weight barrel would likely use the smaller dimensions, because the recoil will be low and handling is probably more important than controlling recoil.  On the other hand, if you working with a 375 H&H you will likely want a heavier stock to help manage recoil.  Grip length and curve may be tighter on a standard caliber where recoil will not bang your knuckles against the trigger guard.  Magnum stocks normally get a longer grip with a more open curve.   Since classic stocks are not generally used on varminters, or benchrest guns excessively heavy barrel tapers do not enter into the question.  However, you will find that much of the data here will apply to other stock designs.   For instance comb height, length of grip, and length of comb are all pretty universal.

I want to use my stock strictly with iron sights, does that make a difference?

Yes, it makes a huge difference.  Looking at the dimensions, you will see that several of the measurements are specified for either scoped or iron sighted rifle.   Use the dimensions for the sight system you will be using as your primary sights on the rifle.

Tricks the Pros use:

Clients want a stock that “fits like a glove”.  To accomplish this, a surprisingly small change is needed.  You will see dimensions for Cast and Cant included in the drawings.  In general, cast off is for right hand shooters and conversely cast on is most often used for left-handed shooters, the same is true of Cant. Grips can ‘Cant’ as well, use the same rule for right and left-handers.  Cant the grip up to about .125” in the desired direction.  This is accomplished by finding the centerline of the stock and then marking the center of the grip canted in the direction desired.

Recoil can be controlled by some simple changes to the stock design.  First, make the butt as large as the design will allow.  Second, use a high quality recoil pad, like the Pachmayer Decelerator®, Kick-Eez®, or Limb Saver®.  The third major method for controlling recoil is making the pitch of the stock neutral.  Pitch is measured as the angle of the butt to the bore line, neutral is 90 degrees to the bore line.  Once the top of the stock along the barrel channel is finished it can be used as the bore line, set the stock upside down on flat table, using a square you can mark the pitch on the butt where you intend to cut it off for the recoil pad installation.  Finally, installation of a mercury recoil reducer in the stock is a great way to control recoil, although it does add weight to the stock.

Each area of the stock should flow smoothly into the next.  Shadow lines if used should be crisp and clean, but not sharp to the touch.  The best way to check these items is to close your eyes and feel with your fingers.  It is amazing how small an imperfection you can pick out with just a touch.

Fred Zeglin is the copyright holder for these prints and is working on an updated file format so they can return to the market. 06/01/2018

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How To: Update an old 10-22, Part IV

This is what the finished forend tip looks like.

Our goal for this post.

I did not like the stubby looking forend as it was after I cut the stock off and made the filler insert shown in the last installment of this How-to.   I rounded up some scrap wood and compared them to the stock to see what I liked best.  I could have used black walnut, english walnut, myrtle, or maple none of them looked good next to the laminate of the stock.  I had a scrap of black and gray laminate left over from a stock I made for a client.  It had the best look of all the samples I held up, just my opinion.

Because of the shape of the stock I felt it best to keep the forend cap short and shaped to match the overall look of the stock.  Of course much of that can be a matter of personal taste.  There are style and form rules for classic rifle stocks, but thumbholes ignore all those rules.  Consequently I was not afraid to make a cap that was different than your used to seeing.

rough forend tip installed on stock.

Shaping of the new tip underway.

Started by sanding the beveled cut on the stock smooth so that there would not be any noticeable gaps in the joint between the cap and the stock.  I put the blank to be used for the cap on the belt sander and removed all the saw marks as well.  Then position the blank to make sure it will provide wood where you need it for the forend cap.

It’s not unusual for the joint surfaces to have a little rounding that would cause a large gap between the two pieces of stock material.  My solution to this is to use a chisel to undercut the stock face leaving just 1/8″ of material at the edges for a tight glue joint.

rouphing out the barrel channel

Scraping out the tip to match the barrel channel in the stock.

Once the epoxy is set it’s time to cut off any excess material and prepare to shape the new tip.  Be sure to leave enough material to get the shape your after, it’s easier to cut more off than to put it back, trust me.  You will note above that we taped off the stock, this is to minimize any chance of damage to the finished stock as I do not plan to refinish the whole stock if I can avoid it.

Shaped and inlet for the barrel.

First coat of finish on.

Chisels, rasps, files, and hand sanders are the standard tools for the shaping of the new forend tip.  Work the shape down to match the existing lines of the stock, since we don’t plan a total refinish we are careful to get close and then file down the last little bit with fine files.  Then switch to 180 grit sand paper to finish the shaping.  By taping the stock with painters masking tape you can sand very close if your careful.  When doing the final blending of the lines tape the stock about 1/2″ back from the joint and carefully sand with 320 paper.  I was cautious at this point not to cut all the way through the stock finish.  Then switch to 400 grit paper, remove the tape and gently blend the sanding lines.

Custom updated 10-22 carbine stock.

Here is the final profile of the forend tip from the side.

Revolution stock was donated by Brownells for this project.

Bottom view of the stock with the new tip on and finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will start refinishing the receiver and other parts in the next segment.   We will also install some aftermarket parts and let you know if there are any tricks you need to learn.  How about a trigger job on the existing 10-22 parts?

Read On: How to Update an Old 10-22

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