Tag Archives: coating

GunSkins® DIY Finishing Anyone Can Do

At the ShotShow in 2019 I picked up a couple of kits form the folks at GunSkins® so I could try them. The variety of skins for different guns in different patterns was impressive all by itself. As a lifetime gunsmith with about 35 years of work under my belt, I have seen a lot of products come and go. In recent years the arrival of many new finishing products for guns has given the client/end-user a lot to choose from. Not many of them are what I would consider DIY, GunSkins truly are!

One of the kits I was given was for a standard AR-15 magazine. Naturally, I selected a patriotic, 2A pattern for my project. GunSkins AR-15 Mag Skins are designed to fit 30-round 5.56 x 45 NATO (.223 Remington) AR15/M4 compatible magazines. The kit includes pieces for the left and right side of a single magazine. I actually read the instructions just for the fun of it… Just six easy steps. It was really pretty self explanatory. A clean surface is the most important thing when doing any finish work, no exception with this product.

I really like the idea of making my magazines easy to tell apart from my shooting buddies. The vinyl provides a modicum of protection to my magazines as well.

Time invested on my first wrap was about a 1/2 hour as I was trying to learn as much as I could about how the vinyl stretches and how the heat gun affects it. I used a couple of things like a pen cap and Sharpie® pen and a cleaning brush to form the vinyl into the grooves of the magazine. Items with a sharp edge may tare the vinyl so everything I used to form was dull or rounded. Occasionally a bubble would refuse to go away, I poked a tiny hole it in with the razor to allow the air to escape. Once you get the hang of the process it would go pretty fast.

Generally speaking, vinyl wraps are less expensive than some of the other gun finishes out there. That does not mean they are cheap. GunSkins says they use the highest quality vinyl for their kits. They offer a 100% waterproof cover, durability and color. GunSkins are NOT permanent the vinyl can be removed

Magazine in place.

Here is the finished product with the magazine in the firearm.

any time you want to change the look of your firearm.

Many other gun finish options require shipping your gun away or waiting hours or days for the finished product to be usable. GunSkins are designed with the end user in mind, as a simple DIY project that can be accomplished in just a few hours. Popular names in camouflage, such as A-TACS, Kryptek, Kuiu, and more are available. Allowing you to match the GunSkins wrap to apparel and gear of the same pattern.

 

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Filed under Gunsmithing, How To, shot show

Melonite, What’s the Scoop?

Before we talk about the Melonite® process, it’s important to understand that you must complete all machine work to be performed on parts prior to treatment.  The finished surface is extremely hard and makes modification of parts after Melonite treatment impractical.  High Speed steel cutting tools will be destroyed trying to cut through Melonite.

MELONITE is a thermochemical treatment for improving surface properties of metal parts. It exhibits predictable and repeatable results in the treating of low and medium carbon steels, alloy steels and stainless  steels.  The process has many stages, from the pre-treatment-cleaning, to pre-heat furnace, to the Melonite salts, quench salts and water rinses.

The MELONITE process  is not a coating.  It is a process that introduces nitrogen and carbon into the surface of the metal.  It produces high wear resistant as well as improved lubricity. The service life of steel tools and parts is extended. Corrosion resistance of unalloyed and low alloyed steels is greatly improved.

The MELONITE process increases fatigue strength  about 30-80% on parts made of alloyed steels. The hardness is maintained up to about 930°F and extends the surface life of steel tools and components which are exposed to heat.

During the MELONITE process, which takes place between 900°F and 1075°F. A two-part nitride layer consisting of a monophase compound layer and a diffusion layer is formed. Total depth ranges from 0.008-0.040″, depending on the composition of the base material and treating time. Hardness in the compound layer ranges from approximately HV 700 on alloyed steels.

A unique feature of salt bath nitrocarburized layers (melonite) is the monophase compound layer, with a nitrogen content of 6-9% and a carbon content of around 1%. Compared with double phase nitride layers which have lower nitrogen concentrations, the monophase layer is more ductile and gives better wear and corrosion resistance by improvement with case hardening.

In metallographic analysis the compound layer is clearly definable from the diffusion layer as a lightly etched layer. A porous area develops in the outer zone of the compound layer. The case hardness of the compound layer measured on a cross-section is up to about 1600 HV on high chromium steels. Treatment duration of 1-2 hours usually yield compound layers about 0.0004″ to 0.0008″. The higher the alloy content, the thinner the layer for the same treatment cycle.

Corrosion resistance of Melonite is exceptional.  Salt spray tests show that Melonite can go nearly four times longer without rust spots developing than with nickle plating.

Sources for Melonite:

http://www.blacknitride.com/

http://www.northeastcoating.com/sectors/firearms

http://www.burlingtoneng.com/melonite.html

 

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Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Pistol

Beginners Kit from DuraCoat, Shot Show 2013

girlsguide

This new kit is for guys who have some spray equipment but have never tried the DuraCoat Products.  The Begginers kit is a simplified version of the standard DuraCoat kits.  Offered in standard Tactical colors.

If you have wanted to try out the DuraCoat line of coatings now is a good time with these simplified kits.

Another new and very important offering is the new DuraFill kit.  It includes 2 ounces of DuraFill, which is used to smooth over scrathes, small pits, or other irregularities in the surface of the metal before covering with DuraCoat.  Of course the big advantage to this product is that it’s totally compatible with the other DuraCoat finishes.

With the largest growing segment of the gun industry, women are not to be left out.  Seven Lauer of Lauer Custom is the developer of the DuraCoat line and he has developed a line for GirlsGuidetoGuns.com just for the ladies.  Seven colors are included in this new line.

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Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, tools