Tag Archives: Anti-Hunting

Are Motor Vehicles More Dangerous Than Firearms?

First of all it’s pretty difficult to take seriously the premise that guns are more dangerous than cars.  In 1994 the Center for Disease Control (CDC) release a publication which made the exact same claim.  According to that article firearms related deaths would exceed the number of deaths related to vehicle crashes in the United States by 2003.[1]

 We are ten years past that prediction and it is not even close to coming true.  When you look at the number of firearms in the United States as apposed to the number of motor vehicles it is obvious that firearms are far safer. 

The CDC actually breaks out a listing specific to death caused by “accidental discharge of firearms”.  For 2010 there were 606 such deaths, in the same period there were 37,961 deaths in “transportation accidents”.

 There are an estimated 245 Million motor vehicles in the U.S. and estimated 310 million firearms.  Firearms are designed to produce damage to the target.  Vehicles are not intended to do any damage at all. 

Take into consideration that there are about twenty percent more guns than cars in the U.S. you would expect far more accidents with firearms.  The reason you do not see this in actuality is that the law abiding citizen who owns a firearm are by their very nature disciplined.  Firearms owners on average know the responsibility of owning a gun and take it seriously.  Consider that millions of rounds of ammunition are expended every year in practice, competition, plinking and hunting.  The tiny number of deaths legitimately attributable to firearms accidents is proof of the great care and thought that goes into properly handling guns by law abiding citizen.

 Some of you may be screaming that I left out a lot of deaths that are tracked in the CDC data related for firearms.  There were 19,392 suicides using firearms in 2010 and 11,078 homicides that involved a firearm.  Terrible as it is, these were intentional acts, not accidents, so they do not belong in a comparison of the danger of firearms vs. motor vehicles, unless you have an agenda that is opposed to firearms.

 In the United States, motor vehicle-related injuries are the leading cause of death for people age 5-34.[2]  Suicide and unintentional poisonings are more common than death by accidental firearms injuries. 

 The unintentional poisoning category is a growing cause of death.  Beginning in 2004, poisoning deaths outnumbered firearm deaths and have increased at a greater pace than firearm deaths since then. Unintentional drug poisonings are the largest component of poisoning deaths; they are primarily related to drug overdose and their rates of increase have outpaced those of all poisonings.[3]

 Often the statistics for firearms deaths are commingled so that it is difficult to determine if the deaths are due to negligence.  Occasionally justifiable force by law enforcement is included in the numbers, further muddying the waters.

 It’s popular to attempt to make firearms seem more dangerous than they are.   The CDC often reports all firearms related deaths as “injury death”.  This is misleading because it includes homicide and suicide in these statistics.  We would not do this for motor vehicle deaths.  Strictly speaking the later two (homicide and suicide) are not unintended injuries or accidents so they do not belong in a comparison of accidental death.  Simply looking at the accidental deaths related to these tools the motor vehicle was involved in 62 times more deaths than firearms in 2010.

 Below are the top ten causes of death according to the CDC.  There is much more to be gained by concentrating on these problems than on guns.  But that’s not as dramatic.

  •  
  • Heart disease: 597,689
  • Cancer: 574,743
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 138,080
  • Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 129,476
  • Accidents (unintentional injuries): 120,859
  • Alzheimer’s disease: 83,494
  • Diabetes: 69,071
  • Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 50,476
  • Influenza and Pneumonia: 50,097
  • Intentional self-harm (suicide): 38,364
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Bob Costas and Jason Whitlock are Intellectually Bankrupt.

Just in case you have been living under a rock since last Sunday night…

NBC sportscaster, Bob Costas often provides commentary at halftime during the weekly Sunday night game. This week he addressed the weekend’s murder-suicide involving Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher.

Paraphrasing and quoting from a piece by Fox Sports columnist Jason Whitlock, Costas said: “In the coming days, Jovan Belcher’s actions and their possible connection to football will be analyzed. Who knows? But here, wrote Jason Whitlock, is what I believe. If Jovan Belcher didn’t possess a gun, he and Kasandra Perkins would both be alive today.”

Belcher shot and killed the mother of his 3-month-old daughter, Perkins, on Saturday morning December 1st. A short time later he committed suicide in the parking lot of the Chiefs’ practice facility at Arrowhead Stadium.

Meanwhile in CASPER, Wyo. — Casper Community College instructor was killed in a senseless classroom murder-suicide Friday, November 30th. Police said James Krumm, 56, gave his students time to flee by fighting the attacker, his son, after the younger Krumm walked into the computer science class and shot James in the head with an arrow.

It was later learned that Christopher Krumm, 25, of Vernon, Conn had stabbed to death his father’s live-in girlfriend at the couple’s home prior to the on campus attack. When police arrived at the classroom after the attack, they found Christopher Krumm bleeding from self-inflicted knife wounds and taking his last breaths. James Krumm was dead at the scene, Casper Police Chief Chris Walsh said.

Bob Costas and Jason Whitlock are either intellectually dishonest or just plain morons. Mentally ill people sometimes make fatal decisions for themselves and occasionally they include others.

Is that fact tragic? Absolutely.

Does it affect the lives of family, friends, and even the community?
More than we will ever know!

Does it mean we need more laws and public policy?
In most cases I would argue the answer is a simple; NO.

Costas tried to use his job as a sports announcer to further his personal political beliefs. In so doing, he purposely overlooks the fact that a mentally ill person does not function from logic. They don’t say, “Oh, I can’t get a gun so I can’t exact my revenge.”

Instead they use a car, a bat, their hands, or as in this example a bow and arrow backed up by two knives. It’s not about the weapon. It’s about the violent act they wish to perpetrate on others.
Saying that Belcher and Perkins would be alive today if Jovan Belcher did not have a gun is intellectually bankrupt. In all likelihood he would have found a way to produce the same result. It’s easy to blame the weapon. Then you don’t have to deal with the people involved and analyze what really went wrong.

When a person tells you that a gun makes it too easy; that is a confession of the quality of their character. They don’t trust anyone but themselves to have good judgment or self control. Look hard at the person who blames the weapon and does not place responsibility on the perpetrator. They are dangerous to themselves and society, because they are pandering to emotions, either for power or to make themselves feel better.

Thank God for the mute button!
I will never again hear Bob Costas spew moronic opinions.

Read more:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/01/casper-college-attack-murder-suicide_n_2223580.html

http://www.ctpost.com/news/us/article/Wyo-campus-killer-near-genius-at-odds-with-dad-4087596.php#ixzz2E9NoRdRl

http://news.yahoo.com/costas-gun-control-commentary-gets-142107845.html

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For 75 Years Sportsman Have Been Green!

This year is the 75th anniversary of the Pittman-Robertson Act, hunters, shooters, and sportsman all  play a vital role in funding wildlife management and conservation through the funds provided by this act.   Nevada Senator Key Pittman and Virginia Congressman Absalom Willis Robertson sponsored the legislation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed it into law on Sept. 2, 1937.

Contrary to the belief of  “animal rights” extremist groups, hunters and sportsmen have been and continue to be the primary players in the effort to protect the game which they hunt. Conservation tactics including carefully regulated hunting, habitat acquisition and species transplants contribute to maintain populations at healthy levels.

The Pittman-Robertson Act took over a pre-existing 11% excise tax on firearms and ammunition.   Under the old law the moneys had gone to the general fund, under the P-R Act the money is kept separate and is given to the Secretary of the Interior to distribute to the States.  Funds are distributed to each state based on a formula that takes into account both the area of the state and its number of licensed hunters.

States must fulfill requirements to use the money apportioned to them. All money from their hunting license sales must be used only by State’s fish and game departments, no diversion of funds is allowed.  Plans for what to do with the money must be submitted to and approved by the Secretary of the Interior.   Once a plan has been approved, the state  pays the full cost and is reimbursed up to 75% of the cost through P-R funds. The 25% that the State must bear generally comes from its hunting license sales.  If, for whatever reason, any of the federal money does not get spent, after two years that money is then reallocated to the Migratory Bird Conservation Act.

During the 1970s, amendments to the act created a 10% tax on handguns and their ammunition and accessories as well as an 11% tax on archery equipment.  It was mandated that half of the money from each of those taxes be used to educate and train hunters through the creation and maintenance of hunter safety classes as well as public shooting ranges.

“Hunting is conservation! There is no greater proof of that than hunters who successfully lobbied government so many years ago to tax themselves—all for the benefit of wildlife,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “That continuing and ever-increasing funding remains the lion’s share for today’s conservation efforts, too.”

It was at the request of the hunting community that the P-R Act came into being.  The Act raises more than $280 million a year for wildlife conservation, and raised more than $2 billion since its inception.  Revenue from state licenses and fees adds up to about $275 million a year, which goes exclusively to state fish and game departments for conservation purposes.  President Ronald Reagan stated it best at the Pittman-Robertson 50th Anniversary when he said: “Those who pay the freight are those who purchase firearms, ammunition, and, in recent years, archery equipment.”

For more info: read this article

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Junk Science and Lead Bullets

Below is an Associated Press story about lead in ammunition.  Note that no scientist is going on record in this article and the there is no evidence presented.  Just could be or maybe.

Since the Jackson area is part of the Yellowstone caldera there are large amounts of heavy metals and minerals found in the area.  Isn’t it more likely that the lead found in the blood of animals in the area comes from their diet.  What happened to you are what you eat?  The predators and scavengers of the area feed on the animals of the area and drink the same water.  Why would they not have heavier levels of lead in their blood.

Being higher on the food chain mean predators and scavengers food sources have already concentrated environmental metals and contaminates in their tissue.  So it is easy to see why such predator and scavengers have more lead in their blood.  I hate junk science, and worst of all, tax payers probably paid for these “scientists” to be out there pushing their personal agendas.

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Researchers say the distribution of nonlead ammunition to hunters in Jackson Hole is likely helping prevent lead poisoning of ravens, eagles and other scavengers.

This is the second year researchers have tried to gauge the impacts of hunters using lead-free ammunition on the levels of lead found in the blood of big-game scavengers.

Researchers distributed nonlead ammunition to some 100 hunters who had 2010 permits for the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park.

Biologists then captured ravens and eagles and measured the level of lead in the birds.

Previous research has shown that lead in ravens and eagles rise during hunting season and then drop off after hunting season ends.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide says researchers plan to hand out more lead-free ammunition next hunting season.

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Filed under ammo, brass, bullets', Firearms, hunting, politics, Second Amendment

Anti Gunners in the Government Create a Problem So They Can Rescue US

It just makes me sick to think that the Justice Department signed off on this.  I hope the Senator investigating never lets go.  The memos mentioned in this report are damning enough to indicate there is malfeasance involved here (For those of you at the justice department, that means your actions are criminal).

Too bad a half dozen of this ATF agents co-workers were not lined up behind him to support his story.  At least he is trying to do what’s right.

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Atlas Shrugged Movie is coming out in April 2011

Visit the Official Atlas Shrugged Movie Web Site!

Atlas Shrugged was Ayn Rand’s warning to the Free World that certain kinds of politics and economics do not work.  This book written in 1957 has remained popular ever since it was first published.  This is one of those stories that; if you don’t have time to read the book, make time for the movie.   The producer has stated publicly that their intention is to remain true to the book and to Ayn Rand’s characters.  Should be fun, and maybe, just maybe will open a few eyes.

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Act Immediately to Block ATF Long Gun Sales Reporting!

Time Sensitive!  Act by February 14th, 2011

Act Immediately to Block ATF Long Gun Sales Reporting!
If you’re one of the nearly 71 million Americans who live in the four southwest border states, some of your gun purchases could soon be reported to the federal government. And whether you live in one of those states or elsewhere, your help is needed now to stop the federal government’s plan to register Americans’ gun purchases.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is demanding the authority to require all of the 8,500 firearm dealers in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas to report all sales of two or more semiautomatic rifles within five consecutive business days, if the rifles are larger than .22 caliber and use detachable magazines. For example, a dealer would have to tell the government every time a deer hunter in Sacramento or Amarillo finds a good deal on a pair of semi-auto .30-06s like the popular Remington 7400.

The ATF has no legal authority to demand these reports, and the flood of new paperwork will waste scarce law enforcement resources that should be spent on legitimate investigations.

Unfortunately, there are only a few days left to comment on this proposal. Comments will be accepted until Monday, February 14. Every concerned gun owner’s voice should be heard on this critically important issue.

To read the ATF proposal, click here

To read the NRA’s comments, click here.

Please send your comments today. Be sure to refer to the December 17, 2010 “Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Report of Multiple Sale or Other Disposition of Certain Rifles.” You can submit your comments to:

OMB
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs
Attention: Department of Justice Desk Officer
Washington, DC 20503

Please send a copy of your comments to:

Barbara A. Terrell
Firearms Industry Programs Branch
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
99 New York Avenue, N.E.
Washington, DC 20226.

Barbara.Terrell@atf.gov
Fax: (202) 648–9640

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Custom 338 Lapua

Here is a rifle built for a client.  Pictures are worth a thousand words, but I will add this.  I personally like Classic Style stocks but a wild thumbhole now and then cleanses the rifle builders soul.

Custom Rifle

Custom Thumbhole rifle stock

Dual Crossbolts to protect the stock for recoil

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Update to “Stop the Stupidity”

It pays for grassroots to make noise.  That combined with the efforts of the NRA-ILA have reversed the DoD decision to suspend the sale of once fired brass.

On March 17th, 2009,  DoD  confirmed the lifting of the suspension to pro-Second Amendment United States Senators Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.), who sent the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) a joint letter vigorously opposing the suspension, on the grounds that it had “an impact on small businesses who sell reloaded ammunition utilizing these fired casings, and upon individual gun owners who purchase spent military brass at considerable cost savings for their personal use.”

In short, good news, problem solved.  Never hesitate to speak, it made a difference here.

For more details see this story:  http://www.nraila.org/News/Read/NewsReleases.aspx?ID=12244

 

http://www.nraila.org/News/Read/NewsReleases.aspx?ID=12244

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The Messiah is a Liah!

The Mesiah

CCRKBA Chairman Alan Gottlieb, reacting to yesterday’s remarks by Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder that the president will seek to reinstate the ban on semi-automatic firearms, Gottlieb said  “We warned America that Obama’s ‘support’ for the Second Amendment was empty rhetoric,” he stated, “and now Holder’s disclosure has confirmed it. Obama was lying, and now gun rights may be dying.”

 U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s response to a reporter’s question on weapons’ regulations, Holder said, “Well, as President Obama indicated during the campaign, there are just a few gun-related changes that we would like to make, and among them would be to re-institute the ban on the sale of assault weapons. I think that will have a positive impact in Mexico, at a minimum.”

Holder refused to speculate when regulations would move forward, likely no law would be passed, instead a decree will be handed down from mount Olympus.   “There are obviously a number of things that are — that have been taking up a substantial amount of [Obama’s] time, and so, I’m not sure exactly what the sequencing will be,”  Holder said.

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF)  in response to Attorney General Eric Holder’s comments on Feb. 25, 2009, about reinstating the assault weapons ban, NSSF issued a press release reminding Congress and all Americans that such a ban would result in a loss of jobs, have no effect on reducing crime and would deprive millions of law-abiding gun owners of their Constitutional right to own the firearm of their choice.

History is a good teacher.  We know that the Clinton Gun Ban had ZERO effect on crime in the United States, or Mexico for that matter.  There is no reason to reinstate this restrictive and useless ban except to limit gun ownership.   Assault weapons as defined in the Clinton Ban were involved in less than 1% of homicides before the assault weapons ban took effect in 1994. The same is true as of 1998. (1)    As of 1998, about 13% of homicides involve knives, 5% involve bludgeons, and 6% are committed with hands and feet. (1)    The Clinton administration prosecuted 4 people in 1997 and 4 people in 1998 for violating the assault weapons ban. (2)

(1)    “1998 NRA Fact Card.” Viewed in January of 1999 on the National Rifle Association web site, http://www.nra.org/

(2)    Heston, Charlton. “Truth and Consequences.” 1999.

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