Tag Archives: 10-22

How To: Update an old 10-22, Part V

Down to the final stretch in our project, “Updating an old 10-22”. First, we disassemble the action completely for refinishing.  There is no short-cut here you have to take it all the way apart or the finished product will not be worth the effort. Our gun was in good shape mechanically but was rough in terms of the exterior finish.Tired old 10-22 Ruger needs to be refinished.

The trigger guard was not much better:  Trigger guard on our 10-22 Ruger was pretty rough too.

The parts were all thoroughly cleaned and bead blasted.  Then cleaned again to insure the removal of all oil contamination.  We used Teflon/Moly Coating from Brownells for this  project.  It is a strong baked on finish that provides a durable finish that has a degree of lubricity built in.  The How To for Teflon/Moly is beyond the scope of this article.  If you want to learn the full process Brownells offers a video on DVD for about $10 that teaches the entire process.

Below is the finish receiver.  We used a matte finish and it looks brand new again.

Action finished with Teflon/Moly from Brownells
Trigger guard with matte finish, like new too.

When we started to reassemble the gun we installed a Tactical Solutions shock buffer to increase the life of the gun.  The factory action has a steel pin in this upper rear position to spread the load of the bolt hitting the back of the action when it cycles.  Tactical Solutions shock buffer for the 10-22 Ruger.There are probably numerous other makers of such buffers, there is probably no big advantage to one over the other.  This one of selected on price and I liked the hard rubber material it is made of.  It should provide a long useful life.

Installing the Shock Buffer.

Then it was time for a trigger job.  When I reassembled the trigger housing I replaced the springs using a Wolff spring kit for the   10-22.  So I had a new extra power trigger return spring, light sear spring, and an extra power hammer spring.  The utilization of this spring kit makes it easier to do a good trigger job on the existing factory parts.

The basics of the trigger job are this:  I stoned the hammer where the sear engages to smooth the contact surfaces and to reduce the sear engagement a small amount.  The sear was stoned to make all the contact surfaces crisp and clean.  The engagement is slightly positive to insure safe/reliable operation.

Like the finish work mentioned earlier the “How To” of a full trigger job is beyond the scope of this piece.  But the above gives you some idea of what is involved.    We ended up with a 3.5 lb. trigger pull using NRA weights to test.

C-More sight installed on the Allchin Scope mount.

Allchin Gun Parts makes a really cool scope mount for the C-More sight system.  At left is the sight all mounted up on the Allchin Scope Mount.  Note that it gets the sight as close to the gun as possible. It’s a sleek and simple design that uses the factory scope mount holes and screws.   Makes for a very fast open eye sighting system.

Thats the whole package finished up and ready to hit the range.  We’ll post a target as soon as I can sneak away for a little shooting.  If you look back over all five parts of this “How To” you will see that this is a project that most gun lovers could do for themselves.  There are literally hundreds of aftermarket parts, stocks, sights, you name it; for the Ruger 10-22, a rifle you can truly make your own with a unique selection of parts to upgrade this reliable shooter.

Our finished custom Ruger 10-22 rifle.

1 Comment

Filed under accuracy, Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Rifles, Rimfire, Stocks, tools

How To: Update an old 10-22, Part IV

This is what the finished forend tip looks like.

Our goal for this post.

I did not like the stubby looking forend as it was after I cut the stock off and made the filler insert shown in the last installment of this How-to.   I rounded up some scrap wood and compared them to the stock to see what I liked best.  I could have used black walnut, english walnut, myrtle, or maple none of them looked good next to the laminate of the stock.  I had a scrap of black and gray laminate left over from a stock I made for a client.  It had the best look of all the samples I held up, just my opinion.

Because of the shape of the stock I felt it best to keep the forend cap short and shaped to match the overall look of the stock.  Of course much of that can be a matter of personal taste.  There are style and form rules for classic rifle stocks, but thumbholes ignore all those rules.  Consequently I was not afraid to make a cap that was different than your used to seeing.

rough forend tip installed on stock.

Shaping of the new tip underway.

Started by sanding the beveled cut on the stock smooth so that there would not be any noticeable gaps in the joint between the cap and the stock.  I put the blank to be used for the cap on the belt sander and removed all the saw marks as well.  Then position the blank to make sure it will provide wood where you need it for the forend cap.

It’s not unusual for the joint surfaces to have a little rounding that would cause a large gap between the two pieces of stock material.  My solution to this is to use a chisel to undercut the stock face leaving just 1/8″ of material at the edges for a tight glue joint.

rouphing out the barrel channel

Scraping out the tip to match the barrel channel in the stock.

Once the epoxy is set it’s time to cut off any excess material and prepare to shape the new tip.  Be sure to leave enough material to get the shape your after, it’s easier to cut more off than to put it back, trust me.  You will note above that we taped off the stock, this is to minimize any chance of damage to the finished stock as I do not plan to refinish the whole stock if I can avoid it.

Shaped and inlet for the barrel.

First coat of finish on.

Chisels, rasps, files, and hand sanders are the standard tools for the shaping of the new forend tip.  Work the shape down to match the existing lines of the stock, since we don’t plan a total refinish we are careful to get close and then file down the last little bit with fine files.  Then switch to 180 grit sand paper to finish the shaping.  By taping the stock with painters masking tape you can sand very close if your careful.  When doing the final blending of the lines tape the stock about 1/2″ back from the joint and carefully sand with 320 paper.  I was cautious at this point not to cut all the way through the stock finish.  Then switch to 400 grit paper, remove the tape and gently blend the sanding lines.

Custom updated 10-22 carbine stock.

Here is the final profile of the forend tip from the side.

Revolution stock was donated by Brownells for this project.

Bottom view of the stock with the new tip on and finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will start refinishing the receiver and other parts in the next segment.   We will also install some aftermarket parts and let you know if there are any tricks you need to learn.  How about a trigger job on the existing 10-22 parts?

Read On: How to Update an Old 10-22

1 Comment

Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Rifles, Rimfire, Stocks

How To: Update an old 10-22, Part III

Stock is cut to match the new McGowen 10-22 drop-in barrel.

Above is the forend of the stock right after I cut it off.  As mentioned in an earlier post the barrel did not look good with the stock at factory length.  The disadvantage is that under the barrel channel there is a cut that was put there mainly to lighten the stock.  As a result I now have a gap under the barrel that looks pretty bad.

Right away I looked at two solutions to the gap under the barrel.  First is to use a piece of the forend that we just cut off to make a plug for the hole. This gap under the barrel needs to be filled to make a professional looking job of it.

File the insert to shape.

You can see that I cut out a small plug to fit the hole under the barrel.  I was careful to select a piece that could be aligned with the layers of the laminate.  Then by hand filing the plug you can fit it carefully so that it lines up with the grain, or laminate in the stock.  A tight fit is important if you wish to minimize the line left when the plug is glued in place.

Below is the plug after some fitting.  Note that the gaps around the edges are minimal and will seal up tight with glue.Plug is carefully matched to the space it is inlayed into.

This is one option.   Another is to make a forend cap or tip similar to what is common on sporter style stocks.  That will be our next installment.

Read On: How to Update an Old 10-22, Part IV

1 Comment

Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Rifles, Rimfire, Stocks, tools