Category Archives: wildcat

Reloading A to Z, from AGI

Guest Blog By Jack Landis

Showing case changes

Explaining how cases are changed when fired.

AGI Tech Services
Manager and Editor, GunTech Magazine

One of the questions I have most often fielded from AGI students and prospective students over the last several years is; “When are you folks going to do a comprehensive reloading course?”

Well, the stars finally aligned and we convinced Fred Zeglin to take the few weeks he had off between the courses he was instructing and his latest writing projects to use his impressive knowledge of reloading and cartridge design to teach this course.

Fred has an extensive background as a professional custom gunsmith, cartridge designer, and author. His books Wildcat Cartridges, Hawk Cartridges, and his AGI instructional video course, Taming the Wildcat are well worth studying by students of the subjects.

This new course is almost eight full hours of the information any reloader needs to know. As he says in the introduction, “There is something for everyone here. If you’ve never handloaded, everything you need to know to assemble safe, effective handloads is here. If you’ve loaded for years, odds are you will still find out things you never knew, considered, or completely understood.” Let’s take a look at what’s actually under the hood . . .

Disk 1 – Brief History of Reloading: This is no exhaustive history of every step in the evolution of loading firearms and cartridges, but rather a concise explanation of how we got to what we actually do today.
Reloading Components: Here Fred shows the various types of cartridge cases, bullets, primers, and powders. He explains their differences and the reasons why those differences exist. Why are spritzer bullets pointed?
Why are some powders shaped like little rods?
Ignition Theory: What happens from the moment the firing pin strikes the primer to the exit of the bullet from the barrel is carefully explained and shown in drawings.
Pressure Curves: A PressureTrace Internal Ballistics System is used to show the real-time gas pressure rise and fall from primer ignition until the bullet leaves the barrel, approximately 1.5 milliseconds. Fred draws curves
which demonstrate what the pressure curves would look like in the Fred Zeglin, Cartridge Designer
case of a dramatic overload, high pressure caused by an over-length case, and powder detonation which can
occur if a very small charge of slow burning powder is used in a large case.
Resource Books: Fred explains why the Cartridge Comparison Guide belongs in your library as well as other books
that give you information on a huge number of cartridge’s dimensions, shapes, ballistics, and terminal performance. The reference books discussed will help you decide what cartridge you might want in your next gun.
Reloading Manuals: Reloading without these “must have” sources is like driving with your eyes shut, a real recipe for disaster. You need more than one so you can cross reference loading data to make sure the load you are
contemplating is safe.

Disk 2 – Developing a load plan: What IS a loading plan and why do you need one? Have you
decided what the load you’re thinking about creating is supposed to accomplish? Do you have a purpose for loading it? What is it? Is it reasonable?

Powder and bullets shown

Selecting correct components for your load plan.

He explains to you why you shouldn’t be “That guy” who just searches for the hottest published load for his cartridge and doesn’t “Waste time” with Starting Loads. “Hey, if it’s published it’s safe, right? These guys always leave a safety
margin, right?” Why you need to keep a complete notebook recording loads, velocity, accuracy, etc.
The Bench: Where should it be, how should it be constructed, how sturdy does it have to be, how high should it be, and why. Press and Die Set-up: Learn how to properly set up the dies, shell holders, and decapping pins from a two die set in your press.

Prepping the Brass: Cleaning, Reaming Inspection: Why you need to clean and inspect your brass, chamfer ream the case mouth and clean out the primer pockets.

PressureTrace Internal Ballistics System
What’s in a “Complete loading kit?” Fred opens a big box from Hornady that contains everything you need to load quality ammo, other than cases, primers, bullets, and powder. Why these make sense for the beginner.

Lubrication: Fred shows you several different methods and products to lubricate the cases prior to resizing, and
why you need to do it.
Full-Length Sizing Dies vs Neck Sizing Dies: Ever wonder what the hoopla about neck sizing from accuracy buffs is all
about? Fred explains why you might want to do it, what makes you able to do it continuously with some cases, why you’ll have to eventually full-length size, and how to avoid “Over-sizing.” Do you know what guns you should not only
never neck-size for, and moreover why you’ll need a “Small base” die? What IS a small base die?
Sizing the Cases: By this time, you will be all set to make those cases like new again.
Priming the Cases: Fred shows you four different priming methods, and why some are better than others in his opinion.
Measuring the powder: Several different scales are shown and how to set them up. After that Fred dips, throws, trickles, weighs, and finally stands and watches a machine do it all.

Disk 3 – Charging Cases: Now we actually begin to load cartridges. Attach the powder measure to the press, verify it is throwing the correct weight, adjust the die so the case is just partially re-sized, and dump the powder into the case. Watch Fred set-up the bullet seating die for no crimp, set the bullet on the top of the case and feed it into the die, adjust its seating depth, and . . . voila!! A real live reloaded round of ammunition made by your very own self.
Seating Bullets with a Crimp: Here you will learn how to set the seating die so it will crimp the case mouth into the bullet’s cannelure just as the bullet reaches the correct depth, and why and when you sometimes need to do this.
Using the Lee Loader: Robart Schaefer demonstrates the use of the basic Lee Loader. Many of we “Senior” reloaders started with one of these tools. It gives you everything you need to load one caliber of good quality ammo for ~ $28. Just supply brass, bullets, primers, and powder. The box holding the tools will fit in the back pocket of your jeans, assuming you don’t fill them as full as some of us.
Fred at the bench demonstrating proper die set up
Next up is Robart Schaefer again, this time with the Lee Hand Press. This is basically a bench type press that
you can use sitting in your La-Z-Boy while watching football. And I have. While it won’t full length resize large
cases, it will do everything else. I probably used it more than anything else with a Lee decapping die, got
my youngest to do a bunch too, and then primed those cases with a Lee Auto Prime. Yep, thousands of them. Got them both for under $50 more than a couple of years ago.
Reloading Cartridges with a Three Die Set-up: Fred explains the use of three die sets. The third die is used to bell the mouth of straight wall cases and pour the powder charge through into the case.
Annealing Brass: Working (sizing) makes it hard and susceptible to cracking. Heating it softens it again and allows more loadings. Fred shows how to do this and gives several alternatives and cautions.
Case Trimming: Here’s where you learn how to trim those over length cases back to the correct size with a couple of different tools and ways of measuring.
Additional Case Prep Procedures: Learn about vibrating, tumbling, and ultra-sonic case cleaners. Learn how and why we uniform primer pockets and flash holes.
Reloading Cartridges Using a Progressive Press: Fred demonstrates a progressive loading press, and describes what happens, and how, at each station.
Disk 4 – Tools and Accessories: Fred wraps up the cartridge reloading portion with a “Show and Tell” of some specialty tools that will make your reloading easier. Shown are extended shell holders to ease the loading of really short cases, a competition shell holder set whose heights vary by .002 inches to allow you to set the exact amount of case sizing you want, powder measure baffle and drop tube, and neck lubers for neck sizing. Specialty dies include neck sizing dies with interchangeable bushings to adjust neck tension, Lee Factory Crimp dies, in-line feeding and micrometer seating
dies, and bullet pulling dies. An impact bullet puller is demonstrated as well.

Bullet Casting: Robart tells us why we should consider casting our own lead bullets and shows what tools and equipment are needed for the process.

Lead: What kinds of lead alloys are needed, where to scrounge what you need, or buy it pure or ready alloyed
if all else fails. The characteristics of the various alloys are discussed and their uses explained.
Pouring Ingots: How and where to heat your lead safely, why and how to flux, and cleaning the dross off the top. It’s kind of cool to see the steel wheel weight clips floating on top of the lead. How to pour the cleaned and alloyed lead into
smaller, easily handled ingots . . . into what looks like corn cob shapes in a jello mold. Why you can never have water around hot lead.
Casting Bullets: Now we get down to actually pouring lead into the molds. How to tell by looking at the bullets whether the lead, mold, or ladle is too hot or cold. He pours from a ladle into the top of single and double molds, and from the bottom into a six bullet mold.
Testing Hardness: Here is a tool the tests the Brinell hardness of the cast bullets and explains how you can determine how hard they have to be based on the chamber pressure of the cartridge they are going to be fired from.
Sizing and Lubing Bullets: Why cast bullets need to be sized and lubed after casting, and how it’s done. What to use for bullet lubes is a choice made based on the bullet’s expected velocity The Lube Sizer Press: This press has a heating
element that heats the lube before it deposits in the lube grooves, seats a gas check, and sizes the bullet, all in one
smooth stroke of the handle.

Final Thoughts on Bullet Casting: Robart wraps up his discussion of bullet casting with a reiteration of why it’s a cool thing to do, and repeats the cautions earlier expressed. Have fun and be safe!

Epilogue: Fred closes by showing a bullet neck concentricity gauge and explains what it tells you and why it is important as a lead-in to a discussion of why learning even more advanced techniques can improve your abilities as a reloader and shooter. If you have never reloaded a single cartridge, you can do so with success and confidence after watching this video course. You will also be able to make informed choices on what tools and equipment will fit your needs and budget.

As a bonus, AGI put Darrel Holland’s Advanced Reloading Techniques course in the package too!

Reprinted courtesy of Hot Brass Magazine

1 Comment

Filed under accuracy, ammo, Firearms, How To, tools, wildcat

28 Nosler Announced at Shot Show 2015

During the first day of SHOT Show 2015 I swung by Nosler’s Booth.  GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

And what to my wundering eyes did appear, the 28 Nosler. That’s right Nosler is adding to their line-up.  The 28 and 26 Nosler utilize the same headspace gauges.

Talking to Mike Lake, who did the design work on these cartridges for Nosler, he stated that everything from 26 to 9.3mm have been registered and approved by SAAMI.  For now, Nosler is only bringing the 28 Nosler to market.

When asked why Nosler took all the designs to SAMMI now Mike said, “We were aware of the wildcats that have appeared on the 26 Nosler case.  So, it just made sense for us to get the dimensions for all the calibers completed and registered with SAAMI.”

The 28 Nosler according to Nosler’s new catalog will push a 160 grain bullet at 3300 feet per second (fps).  A 175 grain bullet will launch at 3125 fps.  In case you were wondering that is faster than the 7mm RUM with less powder.  How is that possible?  Pretty simple really, the 7mm RUM is very over bore, in other words it has too much case capacity for the 7mm bore.

Last years introduction of the 26 Nosler was met with great enthusiasm by shooters.  There is every reason to believe that even more shooters will like the 28 Nosler, 7mm cartridges in general are more popular the 6.5mm in the U.S.  Look for this to be a much discussed cartridge in 2015.

I talked to Pacific Tool & Gauge and 4D Reamer Rentals LTD.  PTG says the 28 is in production already and 4D placed an order for it as soon as the cartridge was announced.  4D also ordered reamers for all the Nosler designs registered with SAAMI.

1 Comment

Filed under ammo, brass, Firearms, Gunsmithing, Rifles, tools, wildcat

25-45 SRC (Sharps Rifle Co.) SHOT Show 2014

Found this little goodie at Media Day for Shot Show.  You might imagine seeing the Sharps name that has always been associated with single shots and then seeing nothing but AR-15 rifles in the booth.  I took a double take…  which is probably what they were hoping for all the writers that visited the event.25-45 SRC ammo

Having been in the gun business for so many years I have seen the rebirth of many company names.  Some have been successful and others have quickly died away.  No telling what will happen with this new company.  Sharps Rifle Company (SRC) is one of several brands, (five at present) under the one roof.

Turns out the item of interest was the 25-45 SRC cartridge.  This is the most recent iteration of a wildcat most commonly known as a 25/223 Remington.  Another well known variation came out in 1987 as the 25 TCU (Thompson Center Ugalde).  The TCU version was designed for metalic silhouette competition.  Of course that cartridge was intended for use in a 14″ barrel from a Contender pistol.  While they are not interchangeable the two cartridges are very similar.  Ahh, what’s old is new again.  I sense a theme here.

  • 65 Grain Rapid Expansion Varmint is advertised at 3300 feet per second from a 20″ barrel.
  • 87 Grain soft point or FMJ loads are advertised at 3000 feet per second also from a 20″ barrel.

Of course, headstamped brass and commercially loaded ammo is always a selling point and SRC is offering just that.  For more information on the brands and products associated with SRC click here.

2 Comments

Filed under ammo, Rifles, Shooting, wildcat

P.O. Ackley and the Trinidad Gunsmithing School

In post World War II, veterans were looking for a way to receive training so that they could start new careers.  Untold numbers of vets wrote to P.O. Ackley requesting training.

Tom Elliot_1947

Ackley returned home from a vacation to find a huge pile of mail on a desk in his office, all from men seeking a chance to learn gunsmithing.  P.O. had tried to train a few men in his business but found that it was counterproductive.  He took the mountain of mail to the Junior College in Trinidad and suggested they start a school to deal with the hundreds of G.I.s who had returned home and had veterans benefits to spend for training.

The school agreed to set up a program and in short order the first round or classes began.  P.O. Ackley taught at the school for the first three years of it’s operation.  He also helped choose instructors who could pass along quality training to the vets.

Ackley left Trinidad in 1951 when his business was sold to an out of state concern.  But the school lives on and is still training gunsmiths today.

A new book on P.O. Ackley will be available in 2017, it will cover his entire career.  From 1936 to 1989 Ackley manufactured scope mounts and barrels, he wrote articles and books, and he was “The Gunsmith’s Gunsmith”.  No other gunsmith of the 20th century was as influential in the firearms trade.  Six years of research have produced an amazing amount of new and interesting information.  You may think you know about Ackley, but trust me, when you read this book you will learn so much more…  

Book has recently been published, “P.O. Ackley, America’s Gunsmith”

1 Comment

Filed under Books, Gunsmithing, Uncategorized, wildcat

Interview with 4D Reamer Rentals LTD

Our sponsor for this blog is 4D Reamer Rentals Inc. It recently occurred to me that we have never talked specifically about 4D to share the services and products that they offer to the shooting public as well as the gunsmith community. So, here goes…

Q. Tell us how you came to own 4D Reamer Rentals?

A. In 2004 the then owner of 4D had half jokingly offered to sell me his company. He was a little surprised when I said I was interested but we worked out a deal and in 2005 I bought the company from him. The rest as they say is history.

Q. Who rents reamers? I would think gunsmiths would buy their own?

We rent to professional gunsmiths as well as hobbyists.

Professionals do buy their own tooling, but nobody can have every tool and many calibers you may only build one or two in your entire career, so it just does not pay to buy such tools. On top of that the chambers popular in one vicinity are not in another. So we provide top quality tools and save everyone both time and money. These days time is often the biggest issue with delivery times from the makers stretching out to several months.

We suggest that gunsmiths purchase the reamers they will use over and over again and rent the rest. It’s probably obvious that hobby gunsmiths really feel the pinch from expensive tools, so they normally rent reamers and gauges to save money.

Q. What are the most popular tools that you rent?

A. The answer is often surprising to people. We check the top rentals at least once a year. It helps us keep inventory levels correct. The top ten rental are always made up of standard cartridges like 30-06, 280 Remington, 300 Winchester, 7mm Remington Magnum, 260 Remington, .308 Winchester, and 6.5×55 Swedish.

I guess it’s not sexy, shooters see to expect the answer to be wildcats. I believe availability of brass and ammo is going to drive popularity of cartridges and therefore our rentals. These common cartridges are the same calibers that the big manufacturers keep in the line up, because they sell.

Pretty consistently the 280 Ackley Improved slips into the top ten as well, but it is one of the few “wildcat” calibers that ranks regularly. There is some controversy surrounding this cartridge but it’s really a no brainer (click here to read about the controversy).

Q. How many reamers do you really stock?

A. We currently have over 675 reamers on hand and continue to add new tools all the time. We stock multiple reamers for the more popular calibers. Even with all those tools there are still more we can add, and nearly every year the factories add one or two new cartridges, so its really never ending. Every tool you see on our list is in the collection, although sometimes they are out on rental, we do everything we can to minimize waiting time.

Q. Does the cost of rental plus the deposits scare off a lot of potential customers?

A. It shouldn’t, that’s one of the items that we work to explain all the time. When a client orders through out web site, which is an automated shopping cart, they will see the deposit amounts displayed on the screen. There is an explanation posted as well that the deposit is not collected at the time the order is place, but rather is the maximum liability the client is agreeing to plus the rental.

Because the web site is automated it has to charge the credit or debit card at the time the order is placed. The site then drops the card information for security. When clients order via phone we do not charge the card at the time of order. However, all the same deposits apply.

So to answer your question directly. The deposits should not scare anyone off, since we do not collect them at the time the order is placed. It would be a nightmare for us to collect and return deposits on hundreds of orders, so we trust our clients to be honorable if sadly something does break or get lost. Most folks in the gun business are of the highest moral caliber, so it’s seldom a problem when a tool is damaged or broken.

Q. Are reamer and headspace gauges the only tools you offer for rental?

A. We offer much more than that. We have sight pushers for pistols, Shotgun choke reamers and taps, specialty taps and dies for muzzle breaks and the like. T-handle extension for reamers, so you can ream through the action, tap handles and die stocks. Specialty tools for AR-15 work. New tools are added all the time.

Q. So everything you offer is rental only?

A. We sell things too. Things like Cerosafe® chamber casting metal, Dakota bolt handles and grip caps, and Savage barrel nuts are all stock items we offer for the convenience of our clients.

Savage drop in barrel have become a very popular addition to our listings. We can chamber for any caliber that we have a reamer for, so we offer more cartridges in Savage pre-fits than anyone. Barrel suppliers can vary widely in delivery time, so we buy from three different makers to help deal with time constraints. Delivery times can be as short as 4 weeks, best to call for an actual quote.

Q. Are all Savage barrels special order then?

A. Mostly. We keep a small stock of barrels, they can be found on the web site under the “For Sale” menu heading. Then look for “Barrels on Hand”. We normally keep the blanks unchambered but threaded and tapered, that way you can pick a barrel and have it chambered for the caliber of your choice.

Q. What about services, anything besides the rental of tools?

A. Sure, we offer rechamber work on single shot barrels for guns that allow the easy removal of the barrel. We do not accept rifles in the shop only barrels, because we do not have or want an FFL. We have a suggested chambering page on the web site that can help customers decide what cartridge will work best for their barrel. Of course there might be other options, we often help with the selection of cartridges.

Q. So what guns are we talking about rechambering for?

A. New England Firearms (NEF), H&R Handi Rifles, Rossi, Thompson Contender or Encore barrels.

We have a flat rate for rechamber work, we do charge a little more when extractor work is needed. We do some rescue work when clients have tried a project without really knowing how to do the work. We are of course limited mostly by the existing chamber and the available chambers we can choose from. These guns are not suited to the fat magnums like WSM, and Rum designs, so we will not chamber them.

We often have folks send in Savage 110 style barrel for rechamber to new calibers. Even the new Axis rifle utilizes the same barrel threads and nut system. We have reworked both factory barrels and custom barrels that were not offered in the clients caliber of choice. It’s pretty cheap in comparison to having a custom rifle built, that’s why the Savage guns are so popular.

Q. Where do you see the rental business going in the future?

A. Well if the past is any indication, it will continue to grow. As tools and other operating costs continue to skyrocket people will continue to look for ways to save time and money. Since we specialize in saving you both time and money, the future is bright. We plan continued growth.

An added bonus for the gun industry is the addition of untold thousands of new shooters who have joined our ranks the last half dozen years or so. As these shooters become more knowledgeable they start to have guns modified and rebarreled. It just means more work for gunsmiths everywhere.

To see everything the 4D Reamer Rentals has to offer check out their web site:  www.4-dproducts.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, tools, wildcat

NRA Gunsmithing Schools come to Flathead Valley in Montana

FVCC Logo

The newest addition to the NRA Gunsmithing Schools is at Flathead Valley Community College in Kalispell, Montana.  This school is being ramrodded by Brandon Miller, who ran the NRA School for Murray State College in Oklahoma for a while.  So, you have experienced management and the instructors are very experienced as well, with a wide variety of expertise.

Everything from Basic Gun Safety, to machine shop, glass bedding rifles, and classes on the 1911.  Much more is listed in the brochure which you can download from the web site linked below.

These short term classes allow professionals to take a little time off from business to expand their abilities, or for the hobbyist its a great way to learn the specifics your interested in.  Either way its a convenient way to learn with classes normally running for 5 days or less.

Check out the list of Classes being offered at FVCC this summer at this link.  I just talked to the staff at the college, and as of today there is still room in many of the classes.  Take a vacation and have some fun.

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under accuracy, Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Pistol, Rifles, tools, wildcat

Can you rechamber my Rossi single shot, NEF Handi-Rifle or TC Encore?

Our friends at 4D Reamer Rental LTD. are now offering rechambering for single shot rifles with break actions. In other words if the barrel comes off, then they will work on it.Encore by TC

The staff at 4D tells me this all grew out of the Savage pre-fit barrels they are selling. They custom chamber these barrels for clients in any caliber that they have tools for, and boy do they have tools, well over 600 chamber reamers on hand. Fred said, “We have no desire to hold an FFL so we will not accept actions in the shop, only barrels. We can rechamber them to any cartridge that is appropriate for the barrel in question. Of course we respect the pressure limits of various actions and will not put a cartridge in a barrel that cannot handle it. Accuracy is normally as good as it was originally and in many cases it’s better because we are careful about proper set-ups and tool alignment.”

Things to consider when thinking about rechambering a single shot barrel.

1. The bore diameter must be the same for the new cartridge as it was with the original, unless you are willing to rebore the barrel as well. (Reboring is cheap).
2. You must pick a chamber that is larger than the original chamber, ideally, larger in diameter and at least a little longer. Sometimes the original neck diameter was on the large size in the factory chamber and when you rechamber it leaves a small groove or mark in the neck area. Normally this is not a problem for function, but it leaves marks on your brass.
3. Ackley Improved cartridges do now work well for single shot rechambers unless your starting from a much smaller case, like a 22 Hornet to a 22-250 AI. This is because of how they are headspaced.
4. If you working with rimmed cases then an Ackley design is fine in a single shot simply because the rim handles headspace.
5. The twist rate of the original barrel should be compatible with the bullet you will likely be shooting in the new chamber.

photo_Handi_Rifle

For ideas on rechambering options see this page at 4D that offers suggestions.

Almost forgot, they can rechamber your Savage barrel too.
Contact them at www.4-dproducts.com or call 406-752-2520
Monday through Friday, 9-5, Mountain time. Of course you can Email anytime.

1 Comment

Filed under accuracy, Firearms, Gunsmithing, Pistol, Rifles, Shooting, wildcat

Rock Island Armory, TCM 22 Bolt Action Rifle

22TCM22TCM has been creating some buzz.  This cartridge is a shortened 223 case.  The original idea was to make a cartridge that would fit the 1911 frame.  This is not the first cartridge of it’s type, the 223 Timbs and the 22 Reed Express were similar designs on the 7.62×25 case.  They were designed to make use of the surplus CZ75 pistols that were available a few years back.  These have since dried up and the prices are starting to climb.

Rock Island Armory (RIA) has designed a center fire bolt action around the 22 TCM cartridge.  Great news for wildcatters, as this is a dedicated pistol length cartridge design.  It utilizes a five round box magazine, but can also use the seventeen round magazines from the pistols RIA offers for this cartridge.

According to Martin Tuason, President of RIA and Armscorp Precision International, “With the early excitement over the TCM rifle, we are ramping up production capabilities to deliver this in late second quarter of this year (2013).”

22 TCM is the brain child if Martin Tuason and Fred Craig,  TCM is an acronym for Tuason Craig Magnum. At slightly over 2800 feet per second with a 40 grain bullet, the 22 TCM will be a popular varmint round for mid range shooting.  The added fun of having a  pistol in the same caliber with interchangeable magazines seems like a winner all the way around.

Stocks are stated to be of Native Philippine wood, so custom stocks will be a natural offering for gunsmiths.  I can already imagine several wildcats for this platform and even a few factory pistol cartridges that would be fun in a tight little package.

Metal finish is listed a parkerized.  Scope mounting is a rail system.  This my be  the weak point of the rifle, but any gunsmith worth his salt can take care of that issue.  More to come on this gun.

14 Comments

Filed under accuracy, ammo, Gunsmithing, Rifles, wildcat

R.I.P. Precision Shooting Magazine

Precision Shooting Magazine has long been considered THE source for serious technical articles on rifle accuracy.  For me it was the first magazine to buy an article from me and I am proud to be able to say they published my works a couple of times.  So, I feel like I am saying good-bye to an old friend.

My contacts with Editor, Dave Brennan have always been cordial and professional, he is a true gentleman.

Some in the industry may point to the end of PS magazine as a further indication that the public will not commercially support a technical journal.   I would argue that there will always be a market for high quality technical articles that truly educate and inform the reader.  Hopefully other publications will see this as an opportunity to fill that need.

There was a time when some of the gun magazines seriously backed writers with technical knowledge and ability to write such quality material.  The reader may not realize how much time, effort, and ammo can be spent to produce an article.  When we are talking about a research piece that is designed to test new ideas or products and enlighten the reader, the preparation for such articles is expensive.  Personally, I hope an editor or two see this as a market opportunity and start producing some in depth technical features.

It’s with great fondness and respect that we say farewell to the Precision Shooting Magazine.

Dave Brennan farewell letter for Precision Shooting Magazine.

 

4 Comments

Filed under accuracy, Books, Firearms, How To, Rifles, Uncategorized, wildcat

Wildcat Cartridges, The Reloader’s Handbook of Wildcat Cartridge Design, now on Amazon Kindle

Wildcat Cartridges by Fred ZeglinBack in 2005 this book had it’s first printing.  The hardback edition of the book contains 288 pages of stories, illustrations, anecdotes, instructions, and data. Many of the cartridges covered in the book include a dimensioned drawing. Foreword by Wayne van Zwoll.  The first edition if now sold out, making the book out of print.  The price of the print copies of the book have already begun to rise in price.  No reprint is planned, so recently Fred Zeglin decided to release the book through Amazon as a Kindle book.

Wildcatting has been around almost as long as the metallic cartridge case. Wildcats have an air of mystery about them, no effort is made in these pages to diminish that mystique. Yet, you will find information here that is simply not available anywhere else. P.O. Ackley was the last Gunsmith to address the subject of wildcatting in depth. Over forty years later, Fred Zeglin, Master Rifle Builder and wildcatter has assembled in an easy to read, often humorous manual for anyone who loves guns, reloading, or wildcat cartridges.

History of wildcat cartridges is presented including many well known designers like P.O. Ackley, Jerry Gebby, and Charles Newton. The historical information provides an appropriate frame of reference for wildcatting. Nobody really wants to repeat something that has already been done. More recent wildcats are included along with reloading data and dimensions wherever possible.

Most valuable of all is the how-to information about making reamers and reloading dies. Fred supplies dimensions and instructions on how they are used to produce highly accurate reloading dies and chambers. Delivery times for such custom tools can delay a wildcat project by many months, knowing how to make your own dies can speed delivery of custom projects by many months.

Click here to go to Amazon.com and check it out.

Fred Zeglin wrote another book about, “P.O. Ackley, America’s Gunsmith”. If your interested in wildcats then this book will definitely be a good read for you.

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Gunsmithing, How To, tools, wildcat