Category Archives: Shooting

The G1 YEET CANNON™ Has Arrived

MKS Supply, Inc., Dayton, OH, July, 2019 – 

Yeet Cannon G1

The G1 Yeet Cannon

Hi-Point’s recent Name The Nine contest for its new 9mm pistol coming out later this year exploded the internet; more than 313,000 votes were cast on the Hi-Point website and more than 450,000 comments were made on other sites. The verdict? Hi-Point’s new 9mm pistol will be called the YC9 and it will be released late in 2019.  Talk about a huge social media coupe!

In the Burger King™  age, nobody wants to wait, so the clamor rose loudly to also yeet up the long established and popular Model C9. To comply with the demand, limited numbers of the current Model C9 will be made with YEET CANNON G1 laser engraved on the slide. The laser engraved letters are big and bold; this is no gun for the shy! This additional work will add approximately $20 to the price of this limited edition engraved Model C9, bringing the MSRP to $179.

Yeet definitions are all over the place but the definition chosen to represent the Hi-Point pistols is the primary Urban Dictionary definition: To discard an item at high velocity. In this case, the “item” being discarded at high velocity is a bullet. YEET CANNON is trademarked by Hi-Point Firearms.

Exclusive Marketer of the G1 Yeet Cannon is:

MKS Supply, LLC

8611-A North Dixie Drive, Dayton OH 45414

www.mkssupply.com

(937) 454-0363

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Filed under Pistol, Shooting

429 Desert Eagle

Have you heard about the 429 Desert Eagle (DE)?

The 429 DE features 30 degree shoulder that it headspaces on and a neck long enough to properly hold and crimp a 240 grain bullet without set back under recoil. Based on the famous 50 AE cartridge, the 429 DE is made with Starline brass, and loaded by HSM in Montana with Speer and Sierra bullets.

Magnum Research is offering the 429 DE Mark XIX pistol, along with barrels and ammunition, for a
full product lineup in the recently introduced 429 DE cartridge. The 429 DE pistol has a stainless
steel slide, a stainless steel frame with Picatinny bottom rail, and a 6″ stainless steel barrel with
integral muzzle brake and black appointments. The pistol ships with a .50AE 7-round magazine and
has an MSRP of $2,143.

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Filed under brass, Pistol, Shooting, Uncategorized, wildcat

EMF’s Updated, GWII Deluxe “Grande Californian” 2019

In 2002, when EMF introduced the Great Western II “Californian” single action revolvers. True to Colt’s original SAA, with the floating firing pin, the “Californian” models feature hammer forged steel barrels, which are highly polished and blued. The CNC machined, dropforged frames are colorcasehardened, in Pietta’s signature deep, rich combination of blues, browns, and purples. These frames are an improvement on the traditional casted frames of the Colt single action revolvers. The wider rear and larger front sights offer faster sight acquisition. The combination of traditional esthetics and the best modern technology made the Great Western II “Californian” a popular, durable, and reliable single action on the market for the last 17 years.

The GWII Deluxe “Grande Californian” model elevates the classical beauty of the “Californian” to a completely new level! Elegantly engraved with a combination of Victorian scrollwork and sunbursts on the blued barrel and deep rich colorcasehardened frame, it is accented with a one-piece diamond checkered grip. If you want an engraved SAA on a budget, this is a very atractive package.

Available in .357Mag or 45LC, the Deluxe “Grande Californian” has a 4 ¾” barrel.
With a MSRP of $655,

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January 19, 2019 · 7:33 pm

Mobile Range

You read that right…  Mobile Range Technologies is proud to introduce
53 ft Mobile Ranges at The 2019 SHOT Show!


One will be a 12 yard range and the other one is 10 yards, with a control room for a range officer. Both will have rear entrances and include the following features:

SPEC SHEET for 53′ DRY VAN  

53′ Dry Van Pistol Range (most common pistol calibers up to 44 MAG (not rifle caliber pistols) 360⁰ Steel plating with:

✓ 2 Shooting Booths include 2 LED Lights per booth plus LED target lighting
✓2 Shooters Shelf that folds flush into wall (center 3rd shooting lane option will be a fold down shelf)
✓ 2 Shooting Lanes 12 yards (10 Yard w/control Room Option) with touch screen controlled wall mounted target retrieval system (patent pending)
✓ MRT Bullet Trap (patent pending)
✓ MRT HEPA Air Filtration (patent pending) with 4 ton AC/Heat pump we use 100% outdoor air that passes across the shooters.
✓Spray foam Insulation
✓Alum. Stairs
✓ 2″ Sound Foam on Ceiling and 1.5” of sound absorbing rubber or 2” sound foam on walls (firing line forward)
✓ Rubber Floor
✓ Meet / Exceed Federal Standards
✓ Easy to clean Stainless Steel (or 2” sound foam) up to Firing Line
✓ 100% Built-In Controls Throughout
✓ All Components Built-In to Walls
✓ Only needs 50amp (70amp w/control room) 208/220 circuit
✓ 1-year warranty
✓ Free Training in Wichita Falls TX.

Optional Features

  • Programmable Target Retrieval System
  • Integrated Live Fire Simulator
  • Camera System
  • Intercom System
  • 3rd Shooting Lane
  • Tactical Training Gates
  • Custom Decals and Rifle Rated up to .308 Win

Rifle Rated Would Have a Rubber Block Bullet Trap

We also have a Shot Show special for orders placed at the show or by February 10th 2019.

Scott Hinton, Owner
Mobile Range Technologies
scott@mrtrange.com

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Filed under Pistol, Rifles, Rimfire, safety, Shooting, shot show, tools

Project ChildSafe Celebrate 20 Years of Leading the Way on Genuine Firearms Safety

As Project ChildSafe, the nationwide firearms safety education program of the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, it’s stepping up efforts with the shooting sports industry to remind gun owners of their important role as leaders in genuine firearms safety.

“Nearly 9,000 retailers, gun ranges, makers of accessories and conservation groups, along with many of the nation’s largest firearms manufacturers, have joined us in spreading the message of ‘Own It? Respect It. Secure It.,’ and encouraging gun owners to store their firearms responsibly when not in use,” said Steve Sanetti, NSSF’s CEO. “With new companies in our industry adding their support for Project ChildSafe, I know we can continue to reduce firearms accidents, thefts and misuse, including suicide.”

Project ChildSafe was launched in 1999 and has become the largest, most comprehensive firearms safety education program in the U.S. Through partnerships across the shooting sports industry, as well as with more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies, the program has distributed more than 38 million free firearms safety kits — each including a gun lock and safety brochure–to gun owners and become the leading voice in promoting safe storage of firearms when they aren’t in use.

The program is financially supported by NSSF member companies, and during its history has received a number of federal and state grants helping to extend its reach. At the industry’s annual trade show this week, the SHOT Show, program leaders are focused on increasing direct industry engagement with customers and the gun-owning public to promote safe firearms handling and storage. The effort is primarily driven by the results the program has already achieved. In the time since Project ChildSafe launched, fatal firearms accidents in all age groups have dropped to historic lows, according to the National Safety Council. Additionally, in 2017, the Government Accountability Office issued a report with a clear determination that giving gun owners free gun locks, as Project ChildSafe does, results in more gun owners choosing to use the locks and store their firearms securely.

Sanetti said that there are many safe storage options gun owners can use to keep guns out of the wrong hands, including lock boxes, and that parents should make it a priority to talk with their children about gun safety.  “The firearms industry is committed to the safe, legal and responsible use of firearms, and, as an industry, we are the leading voice in the national conversation to promote responsible actions among legal gun owners, to help prevent accidents and to help keep guns out of the wrong hands. Because all those actions are real solutions that make homes, neighborhoods and communities safer,” Sanetti said.

NSSF’s Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show presents a perfect opportunity for industry members to learn more about Project ChildSafe and how they can be involved. Project ChildSafe will be on site at the 2019 SHOT Show in booth #2426 and, because mobilizing an industry also requires engaging the leading voices in that industry, Project ChildSafe will host a special “Women of the Gun” reception, on Wednesday, Jan. 23, featuring many of the most prominent women in hunting and the shooting sports today.

For more information on Project ChildSafe and how to get involved, visit projectchildsafe.org

 

About NSSF

The National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 12,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers. For more information, visit nssf.org.

 

About Project ChildSafe

NSSF launched Project ChildSafe in 1999 (prior to 2003 the program was called Project HomeSafe) as a nationwide initiative to promote firearms responsibility and provide safety education to all gun owners, young adults and children. Through partnerships with more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies nationwide, the program has provided more than 38 million free firearm safety kits to gun owners in all 50 states and the five U.S. territories to help prevent firearms accidents, theft and misuse. That’s in addition to the more than 70 million free locking devices manufacturers have included with new firearms sold since 1998 and continue to do today. Project ChildSafe was also recognized as one of three finalists in the National Safety Council’s 2018 “Green Cross for Safety” Awards. Learn more at projectchildsafe.org.

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Filed under How To, safety, Shooting, shot show

300 PRC Carves out a niche’ for Long Term Success.

Hornady has confirmed a report concerning the DoD’s decision: “The 300 Precision Rifle Cartridge (PRC), released by Hornady earlier this year, was tested and selected by the Department of Defense for its extended long range sniper program following a rigorous evaluation process that saw the new Hornady 300 PRC outperform the 300 Norma Mag as well as several other cartridges in testing past 2,000 yards.”

U.S. Department of Defense is adding the all-new Hornady 300 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) to its arsenal. Last week the DoD awarded Barrett a contract to provide an undisclosed number of MRAD rifle systems chambered in 300 PRC.

More about the Hornady 300 PRC…

In keeping with current trends with new cartridges the 300 PRC is a non-belted magnum design. The 300 PRC is based on the .375 Ruger case.  Cases measure .532 at the base; this is the same as the .300 Winchester Magnum, so it will use a standard belted magnum bolt face.  There has been a wildcat version of this cartridge for many years, the 30/375 Ruger.  Another wildcat on the 375 Ruger is the 35 Miracle simply the 375 necked down to 358 caliber.

Our Sponsors over at 4D Reamer Rentals already have a couple of 300 PRC reamer and gauge sets on hand.

You can watch testing of the Hornady 300 PRC on BallisticMag.com.

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Filed under accuracy, ammo, brass, Firearms, Gunsmithing, reloading, Rifles, Shooting, wildcat

Excerpt from “Gunsmithing Student Handbook Series”

At the time of this writing there are three books in the Gunsmithing Student Handbook Series.  In early 2018 “Chambering Rifles for Accuracy” was released.  In its first week on Amazon.com it was #1 in two categories.  Gordy Gritters, famed benchrest gunsmith & Fred Zeglin well known wildcat and hunting rifle maker joined forces to create this comprehensive title.  It covers the subject of installing and chambering barrels from simple rechamber jobs, to hunting rifles and the last half of the book is all about benchrest quality gunsmithing.

The excerpt here gives you an idea of how careful the authors are to cover details often overlooked in such books.  Enjoy:

Tolerance Stacking; 
                Everything You Need to Know About Pilots?

Chamber reamers come with two styles of pilots, solid or removable bushing (the later sometimes called a floating pilot).  One is evil and one is practically perfection.  But which is which?  I can tell you that in renting tools to gunsmiths I have found the industry is split on this question about 50/50.  In other words, about half demand solid pilot reamers exclusively and the other half will not touch those nasty solid pilots with a ten foot pole.

It is clear that there is a trend toward the removable pilot reamers.  This is because barrel makers are not all holding to the same production standards.  Some have the idea that a tighter bore is better, while other makers hold close to the “standard” bore dimensions.  Example, .308 bores are .300” on the bore and .308” on the groove.  Custom barrel makers have tightened the bore to say .298”  This will required a smaller pilot as the standard pilots are normally .299” with tolerances of + 0 to – .0005”. removable pilot reamer 

Removable pilot reamer.

The reason for the tighter bore?  In short, it is believed that it produces better accuracy.  This is only true as compared to a loose bore that is oversized, i.e. a groove on a 30 caliber of .309 or .310 will produce lower pressures and potentially be less accurate because the bullet is not fully engaged until pressure bumps the bullet up to match the bore.

For a pilot to work correctly it should be .001” smaller than the actual bore dimension.  In other words, it needs to be a close slip fit.  If a pilot is too tight it will bind and likely break the reamer, and possibly damage the bore.  If a pilot is too loose it will promote chatter.  It is possible to run the pilot on a removable pilot reamer closer to the bore diameter (.0005” under bore diameter is ideal), but it must still slip easily in and out to avoid damage to the barrel or the tools.

A little history at this point might be interesting:  Red Elliot was and still is legendary with old timer gunsmiths as the absolute best reamer maker of the last century.  Near as I can tell he was the first to offer removable pilots on his reamers.  Why did he do this?  Well, he found that there were enough different barrel makers in his day that the dimensions of the bore diameter (where the pilot rides) varied a fair amount. 

So, this problem of bore dimensions changing a little is nothing new.  What about SAAMI standards you say?  I will address that in just a moment, for now lets talk about how Red Elliot handled bushing pilots.

I have seen several of Red’s reamers with bushing type pilots, what we sometimes call floating pilots today.  Red held very tight tolerances on his bushings so that it required a little pressure to slide them onto the reamer, held in place by a screw mounted in the end of the reamer the bushing would not turn once the screw was tightened.  This is contrary to the bushing pilots we see commonly used today, where the bushing is a slip fit with about .0005” tolerance internally.  This tolerance is added for manufacturing ease. Tolerance stacking is not usually mentioned in conjunction with floating pilot reamers, but we are going to take a closer look at it here.

Another source of tolerance issues is the fact that the pilot receiver on the reamer must be concentric (round), and in line with the reamer.  If either of these conditions is not correct there will be problems with the reamer cutting oversized or out of alignment with the bore.  Admittedly, this is not much of an issue with today’s cnc machines.  So long as the operator does not make an error, and no chips get caught in the set-up.  One other possible source of trouble would be a warped reamer (not common).

Now for SAAMI, their standards are voluntary, so obviously any barrel maker can decide whether or not to hold solid to the standards.  Industry standard is plus or minus a half thousandth (+ or – 0.0005”) on the bore diameter.  The bore diameter is the smallest diameter of the barrel, also referred to by shooters as “across the lands”.  The same tolerance applies to the groove of the barrel.  I will leave the discussion of groove depth as we are talking about bore diameter as it relates to chambering tools, groove depth does not affect these dimensions.

Admittedly barrels considered “match” grade or “air gaged” are supposed to be held to a tolerance of .0003” or less total variance, end to end of the barrel.  This does not indicate the actual bore diameter, we are left to assume that it is the standard diameter for caliber.  In the case of a 30 calibers we would be talking about a .300” bore.  What if the maker decides to simply use a gage that works with the bore diameter they are making, say .2995” and it air gages as above.  You have a match grade barrel but the bore is at the minimum size according to industry standards. 

Are you starting to see how bores can vary and still be within standards?

Of course there are those makers who operate outside the standards and make perfectly good barrels.  The point being; different size pilots will be needed to chamber these barrels as was recognized back in the 1950’s and 60’s by Red Elliot.  It’s pretty obvious by now that removable pilots are necessary tools in dealing with variations in bore dimensions.  It should be clear by now that variations in bore diameter of plus or minus .001” or even more, is not that unusual, even though such dimensions do not follow the voluntary standards set by SAAMI.

Solid pilot reamers offer certain advantages over the floating pilot.  First and most obvious there is no built in tolerance between the bushing and the reamer, because the there is no bushing.fixed pilot

 

 Solid Pilot Reamer

Since most barrel makers today are making barrels by the button rifled method dimensions tend to remain pretty steady for a given maker as buttons last a long time if properly cared for.  So if you deal with the same barrel maker all the time chances are a solid pilot reamer will fit the same from barrel to barrel. 

There are other factors that play into the bore and groove dimensions, but that is for a discussion for another book.

One limitation of a solid pilot reamer is that it cannot be changed to deal with variations in bore diameters.  Of course you can have the pilot ground down if necessary to fit a tight bore, but then you would probably need a second or even a third reamer to deal with various diameter bores. 

Everything in life is a trade-off.  Because of the expense of multiple reamers for the same caliber removable pilots are a cost effective answer to the problem.  $10 for a bushing beats $100 or more for another reamer.  There are shops that stock bushings in 0.0002” steps for the popular calibers.  This allows them to match the bushing to the bore every time.

pilot bushingsPilot bushings can be a big investment.

To make the use of removable pilots efficient and accurate, the gunsmith should invest in a set of pin gauges.  These are precision ground pins that can be used to gauge the bore and insure that the correct bushing is selected.  Using pin gauges allows the gunsmith to know what bore diameter the barrel maker is really supplying.

Now keep in mind the pilot has to slip into the bore, so in mechanical terms the pilot has to be about 0.0004” smaller than the bore to slip in without any interference. In most shops the pilot is figured at 0.001” smaller than the bore and rightly so.  Too tight a fit can gall and or leave marks in the bore or stress the reamer and break it during the reaming process.

What happens if the pilot is too loose?

Ninety-Nine times out of a hundred when a reamer chatters (vibrates) in use, it is because the pilot to bore fit is too loose. 

The lack of support when the pilot is too small allows the reamer to move around in the bore, as the tool tries to bite into the steel it grabs hard and because even tool steel is flexible you get chatter as the tool loads and releases tension.  This is the reason that some gunsmith’s insist on having a set of pilots that cover the possible variations in .0002” (That’s 2/10,000 of an inch.) increments.  Keeping the pilot as close to bore dimensions as possible will help eliminate chatter and promote a more precise chamber. 

If you have a pilot that is a perfect match for the bore but is too loose on the inside where it rides on the reamer then the advantage of a close fitting pilot is negated.  To pull the whole concept together…  If you have a .0002” tolerance on your bushing to barrel fit and the same on the pilot to reamer fit, you end up with .0004” total slop on the pilot. 

I can tell you that most people do not grasp this or understand why these tolerances  matter.  I base that statement on 30 years of talking to gunsmithing customers, and the people who call to rent tools.  The comments that shooters and gunsmiths make during our conversations indicate their level of understanding in a hurry.

In general if the total pilot run-out is under .001” then all will work fine and there should be no worries.  This rule holds true for solid pilot or removable pilot reamers.  Long ago I lost track of how many rechamber and barrel jobs I have done.  I can tell you that

Chambering Rilfes for Accuracy, cover

 it is possible to get an accurate job from either type of reamer.  In fact, if pressed for a choice I would say that solid pilot reamers are more accurate on average.  Especially for inexperienced gunsmiths.

I do not make this statement lightly, as I own hundreds of reamers of both types.  This goes back to the understanding of how the tools relate to the barrel.  To reiterate, the one caveat would be that for best accuracy the pilot of the reamer must meet the tolerances of less than .001” run out verses the bore, for all this to hold true.

There is another major factor in how well a reamer cuts and how accurate the gun will be…  The gunsmith must do a good job on the set up for machining.  If the threads are not true to the bore, or the chamber is crooked or oversized, or the throat of the chamber ends up off center, accuracy will be elusive to say the least.

Use of a floating reamer holder is a great way to insure an accurate chamber.  This tool allows the reamer to follow the hole in the barrel without any side pressure that might be caused by minor misalignment of the tail stock to the bore of the lathe.

Whether you plan to build accurate hunting rifles or top quality competitive benchrest and long range guns this handbook has detail descriptions and plenty of clear photos to make the subject easy to understand.  The other titles in the series deal with headspace, the vital counterpart to chambering, check them out here.  More titles are planned for the series.  These are college level training manuals that a gunsmith at any level of experience will value.

Another post of interest on this subject.

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Filed under accuracy, Books, Gunsmithing, How To, Rifles, Shooting, tools

The Big News for Fred Zeglin, April 2018

How many authors can brag that they held #1 in two categories on Amazon.com?

I don’t know the answer to that, but I am one of them so here I am, bragging.

Last month (April 2018) Gordy Gritters and I (Fred Zeglin) released our new book, “Chambering Rifles for Accuracy”.  This book is the 3rd in the Gunsmithing Student Handbook Series. Obviously the reception of the book and it’s counterparts in the series has been very good.  It’s gratifying to see our work appreciated by so many customers.

On behalf of Gordy and myself.

Thank you for pushing us to #1 on Amazon during the first week of April.

#1 on Amazon

#1 in Two Categories on Amazon!

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Filed under accuracy, Books, Gunsmithing, How To, Rifles, Shooting

Flathead Valley Community College offers AAS in Firearms.

Learn Skills

Projects that Challenge

Heading into our fifth year, this program started out as a two-semester certificate program created to provide a solid foundation in theory, design and function of firearms. In 2017 the program grew to include a second two-semester certificate. The second certificate will interest folks who are more interested in traditional gunsmithing and custom gun work. The Big new for 2018 is that the Board of Regents authorized a two year degree that combines all the classes into an Associate of Applied Sience (AAS).

Course topics will include firearms safety, manual mill and lathe operation, bench metal techniques, firearms repair, machine tools for gunsmiths and precision rifle building. Stock making, checkering, bluing and other finish techniques are taught along with custom modifications of all kinds of firearms.  Many of the classes have little or no prerequisites, so they are open to anyone who would like to learn and expand their experience with guns, contact the school for more information.

Students who successfully complete the program will be prepared for entry-level positions in the firearms industry and will have a better understanding and knowledge base for owning a gunsmith business. The program contains both lecture and significant hands-on training designed to instill an understanding of the design and function of today’s firearms.

“FVCC has the only Firearms Technologies Certificate Program of its kind in the country,” said FVCC Firearms Technologies Coordinator Fred Zeglin. “Students are challenged to develop skills that are not part of any other program. We are very proud to now offer a two year AAS degree that will jump start a student’s career in firearms.  By partnering with manufacturers in our area we have assembled a program that addresses the needs of the employers.”

Applicants must be at least 18 years old and able to legally own and possess firearms. A background check is required for all students who are accepted into the program.

The program was developed to build upon a foundational machining background, which is provided through the college’s Tier I Machining Certificate Program. Tier 1 Machining . Firearms Technologies Program applicants with industry or previous learning experience may opt to bypass the Tier 1 Machining Certificate Program by requesting testing and/or instructor consent.

Prospective students must apply both to the Firearms Technologies Program and for admission to FVCC. Firearms Technologies Program applications are available online at www.fvcc.edu/firearms or in the Admissions Office in Blake Hall on the FVCC Kalispell campus. For more information, contact Will Richards at 756-4862 or wrichards@fvcc.edu.

Download the application to attend classes

NPR story about the program

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Filed under accuracy, Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, Pistol, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Shotgun, Sights/Scopes, Stocks, tools

You’ll Shoot Your Eye Out Kid…

Every time I pick up a BB gun I find myself in the backyard with my Dad at six years old.  Shooting my old Daisy BB gun at a cardboard box. A 15 foot target taped to the box and doing my darnedest to keep them all on the box.

Over the years I got to play with that BB gun a lot and it helped me to learn how to line up sights and squeeze a trigger, because if you jerked the trigger it was a foot off and you could watch the BB miss the box or whatever your target might be.

Naturally like every kid turned loose with a BB gun I shot at something that caused the BB to ricochet back.  That was a hard lesson, but not soon forgotten.  I’m in favor of letting kids learn a few hard lessons so long as they don’t loose and eye in the process.  I seem to recall a Christmas Classic Movie that focuses on  that very concept?!

Well the folks at Air Venturi have an answer for the BB ricochet of our youth.  They plan to stop them with Frangible BBs.  Most of the time I hate “New and Improved” ideas because the standard steel BB we all know.  And, when it hits something hard if fractures and falls apart, unlike the old steel BB we all know and love.

Many times I am not a fan of the “New & Improved” product, they tear away some memory or valuable lesson from our youth.  This one I can get behind though.  It allows the BB to travel at a velocity about 10% faster than the common steel BBs we all know and love and when they hit something hard, instead of bouncing back they turn to dust on the spot.  You can even call them “Green” because they contain no lead.

Next some Nam-by-Pam-by will tell us the kids have to wear a dust mask when they shoot these new Frangible BBs.  I draw the line there, just take the kids out and have some fun introducing them to the fun of the BB gun.

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Filed under Firearms, Shooting