Category Archives: brass

28 Nosler Announced at Shot Show 2015

During the first day of SHOT Show 2015 I swung by Nosler’s Booth.  GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

And what to my wundering eyes did appear, the 28 Nosler. That’s right Nosler is adding to their line-up.  The 28 and 26 Nosler utilize the same headspace gauges.

Talking to Mike Lake, who did the design work on these cartridges for Nosler, he stated that everything from 26 to 9.3mm have been registered and approved by SAAMI.  For now, Nosler is only bringing the 28 Nosler to market.

When asked why Nosler took all the designs to SAMMI now Mike said, “We were aware of the wildcats that have appeared on the 26 Nosler case.  So, it just made sense for us to get the dimensions for all the calibers completed and registered with SAAMI.”

The 28 Nosler according to Nosler’s new catalog will push a 160 grain bullet at 3300 feet per second (fps).  A 175 grain bullet will launch at 3125 fps.  In case you were wondering that is faster than the 7mm RUM with less powder.  How is that possible?  Pretty simple really, the 7mm RUM is very over bore, in other words it has too much case capacity for the 7mm bore.

Last years introduction of the 26 Nosler was met with great enthusiasm by shooters.  There is every reason to believe that even more shooters will like the 28 Nosler, 7mm cartridges in general are more popular the 6.5mm in the U.S.  Look for this to be a much discussed cartridge in 2015.

I talked to Pacific Tool & Gauge and 4D Reamer Rentals LTD.  PTG says the 28 is in production already and 4D placed an order for it as soon as the cartridge was announced.  4D also ordered reamers for all the Nosler designs registered with SAAMI.

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New 26 Nosler® Will Unveil at SHOT Show 2014

comparing the 26 Nosler to othersNosler is looking to tap into the long range market with it’s latest offering.  The 26 Nosler® case is non-belted, thus headspaced off of the shoulder to further enhance accuracy. The “26” also utilizes a standard (30-06) length action meaning shorter bolt-throw and lighter weight than magnum length actions. 

The 26 Nosler® cartridge was designed to take advantage of the inherently accurate and high B.C. 6.5mm (.264) caliber bullets, and is capable of shooting the Nosler® 129 grain, AccuBond® Long Range™ bullet at a blazing 3400 fps out of the muzzle.  Zeroed at 350 yards, the 26 Nosler® has a Point Blank Range of 0-415 yards.  Loaded with the 129gr ABLR, the26 Nosler® retains as much velocity at 400 yards as the 260 Remington® produces at the muzzle.

The 26 Nosler® is a new and unique cartridge that was submitted to SAAMI® in June, 2013. The formal launch will take place at the 2014 SHOT Show.  Nosler will introduce a rifle, brass, ammunition and a new bullet all in conjunction with this cartridge.

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Nosler with NEW Products at Shot Show 2013

Nosler7Nosler has a lot of new products of interest to the shooter and reloader for 2013.

First off the new Nosler reloading manual #7 is out both in print and in a digital edition.  864 pages of data and articles.  More than 120 cartridges are included and some new propellants have been added along with new bullets from Nosler.

In Nosler brass new offerings include the 6.5 Grendel, 6.5 Creedmoor, 7×57 Mauser, 300 AAC Blackout, and the 375 Ruger.

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Indiana Allows Longer Cartridges

A few years back the Department of Natural Resources in Indian decided to allow the use of rifles of limited size.  Size of cartridge that is.

Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of .357-inch diameter or larger; have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches; and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, 357 Maximum, .38-.40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-.40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W.  Of course certain wildcats fit this definition as well, i.e. 350 Indy (35 WSSM) and others.

Starting with the hunting season in 2012 the maximum rifle cartridge length that can be used in the firearm season has been extended to 1.8 inches. This means that the .460 Smith & Wesson, .450 Bushmaster, and .50 Beowulf will be legal to use during the deer firearms season.

The 358 Hoosier  is a shortened 358 Winchester case that meets the new limits and is drawing a lot of interest. The 358 IDC also known as the 350 Indy is the 25 WSSM necked up to 35 caliber, this is a great use for WSSM guns that nobody seems to like.  UPDATE: These last two have now been redesigned to meet the change in the rules, both are now available in 1.80″ versions.  The Hoosier is designated 358 Hoosier 1.8″ and the 1.6″ versions still exists.  The longer version of the IDC is designated the “358 IDC II”.

If you want to read the complete information check these links.

http://www.eregulations.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/12INHD-FINAL-LR.pdf

http://www.eregulations.com/indiana/hunting/pageFlip/

http://ajbrownarms.com/articles/announcing-the-358-hoosier/

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280 Ackley Improved Emperical Headspace Test

Top is SAAMI or Nosler type headspace gauge for 280 AI. Bottom is the “Traditional” headspace gauge for the 280 Ackley Improved, note the difference between the shoulder angles.

These Chamber gauges were made using the headspace gauges as marked. The purpose being that we can visually see the difference and measure any difference when the gauges are swapped, or ammunition is checked.

Here the gauges have been swapped to the incorrect chambers. NOTE: no difference in headspace, both gauges are flush with the base of the chamber gauge.

According to the argument, The case in the “Traditional” chamber should be .014″ too deep in the chamber. As with the gauges headspace is zero.

The discussion of headspace and the 280 Ackley Improved has been going on far too long.  Recently I decided to perform a test that would demonstrate the differences or similarities between the SAAMI (Nosler) gauge and the “Traditional” Ackley gauge.

First you can see that the shoulder angle is not the same.  The SAAMI gauge is 40 degrees like the factory brass and ammunition.  The Traditional gauge is 17 degree 30 minute just like the original 280 Remington gauge and factory 280 Remington ammunition or brass.

The Chamber gauges pictured below were both made with the exact same 280 AI reamer.  The only difference between the SAAMI and the Traditional chambers are the headspace gauges, all other measurements are identical.

Each chamber gauge was stamped with the name of the gauge used to headspace it.  The headspace was set to zero, or flush with the flat base of the gauge.

Once I had both chambers cut I swapped the gauges expecting to see some obvious disparity as the reamer makers have been emphatic that there is a difference.  However, there was no difference between the two chambers.

How could that be?

Well, when you check the drawings from SAAMI and the Traditional drawings for the Ackley Improved you find that indeed there is a numerical difference between the two drawings of .014″.  The problem stems from reamer makers applying a datum line to the Traditional Ackley drawing at the .375″ diameter on the shoulder, this is not where the datum line is on a traditional Ackley.

The drawing calls for a 40 degree shoulder, but the datum measurement is based on the traditional 17 degree gauge.  In other words the systems of measuring are mixed.  Ackley used the junction of the neck and shoulder to headspace his Improved chamber, not the datum line along the shoulder.

Hence we end up with a headspace length of 2.1542″ on the Traditional drawing.  I measured this length on my cutaway chamber and guess what, that is the length to the junction of the neck and shoulder.  Thus headspace matches the drawings correctly.

The 40 degree SAAMI gauges are made to the industry standard, datum line method.  So the drawings are correct, the datum line is at the .375″ diameter along the shoulder.  The length called out for this gauge is 2.140″, which appears to be .014″ shorter than the Traditional design.

What we have is two different methods of measurement.  However they achieve the exact same result.  Seeing is believing.

With all that said, for liability reasons I would still use the gauge the client asks for.  It’s easier than explaining all this over and over again.

The obvious question will come up, “But I am still having trouble with headspace, so the Nosler brass must be wrong?”  The answer is; More than likely a lazy or inexperienced gunsmith did not use a gauge to set headspace, but rather used brass.  The Nosler brass should work in a “Traditioinal” chamber if the headspace was set between a go and no-go as prescribed by P.O. Ackley and every reamer maker that sells these tools.

Here are some additional source of information on this subject:

http://gunsmithingradio.com/2012/08/16/interview-with-andy-huebschmann-episode-12/

Book has recently been published, “P.O. Ackley, America’s Gunsmith”

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New Gunsmithing Courses Available Summer 2012

Gunsmithing Classes

FVCC’s Continuing Education department has announced the addition of gunsmithing courses to their offerings.  During July of 2012 seven new courses will be offered to hobby gunsmiths and professionals alike.  Brandon Miller, Coordinator for the new Gunsmithing courses was the NRA Coordinator for Murray State College as well as a gunsmithing instructor, until his move to the Kalispell area in 2011.

Two armorers courses are being offered and are in the process of accreditation via POST.  The first is an AR-15, AR-10 Armorers Course.   This five day (40 hour) course is to familiarize the student with the AR-15/AR-10 weapons format. Instruction will include function, disassembly,  as well as reassembly, of main and sub groups.  Troubleshooting and function testing tips, tool use and the installation of many aftermarket custom parts. Optional caliber choices in the AR-15 format will be addressed. The AR-10 and various manufacturers will be discussed, with particular attention to compatibility of parts. Students should to bring their own firearms as guns will not be provided.

Second, a five day (40 hour) course will focus on design, function and repair to factory service specifications for shotguns, including the study of feeding, loading, extraction, headspace, gas systems and basic repair and maintenance of all parts. Guns covered will be Benelli M1, Remington 870, Remington 1100, Remington 11-87, Mossberg 500, Mossberg 835, etc.

An exciting opportunity to learn from an American Custom Gunmakers Guild member, Lee Helgeland, the art of gunstock checkering. Tools, layout and patterns will be discussed in depth as you actually checker your own gunstock. The tips and tricks discussed can shave years off the learning curve of this artistic and functional part of stockmaking.  Bring your gunstocks and tools, this is a hands on class.

Fred Zeglin, Master Gunsmith, will be teaching two classes for this program.  The first is his popular Wildcat Cartridge Design class.  This class takes the student from a raw idea to making the tools needed to form brass and chamber a barrel for a custom cartridge design.  Students will make tools in this class and walk away with a full understanding of how to safely design and test a cartridge.

Fred’s second class will be Glass Bedding for rifles.  This five day course will highlight stress-free bedding processes while focusing on pillar bedding. The course will discuss the intricacies of the ultra accurate bolt action field rifle on today’s market. Areas covered will be bedding, scope mounting, headspace and triggers. The student will have the opportunity to bed at least one rifle in the method he/she chooses. Methods for different actions and reasoning behind the different processes will be discussed in detail. Stock pillars will be made in class.  Bring your rifle.

Other classes will be Alterntive Finihses: The purpose of this class is to familiarize the student with various finishes other than hot caustic bluing. There will be an instruction and demonstration in hot water bluing treatments such as Brownells Classic Rust Blue and Dicropan IM, as well as Nitre Blue. Students will also be instructed in the use of Zinc/Manganese Parkerizing as well as the setup and application of various spray-on finishes. Students will have and opportunity to apply Parkerizing or one of the spray-on finishes to at least one firearm and possibly a second one if time allows.  So, bring your projects.

Finally, Color Case Hardening. The differences between color case hardening modern actions as compared to antique actions will be discussed. Participants will receive hands-on training as they color case harden various parts and/or actions. Students will need to bring their own projects.

There are only a few gunsmithing schools around the country, so in order to take these classes students normally have to travel to one of these schools.  By offering these classes FVCC becomes the only school in the Pacific Northwest to provide such quality training.  For more information contact the Continuing Education Offices at FVCC, (406) 756-3822 or better yet, check out their web site:  https://ace.fvcc.edu/ShowSchedule.awp?&Mode=GROUP&Group=GS&Title=Gunsmithing

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Zombie Max™ Ammo Plant being auctioned to benefit USA Shooting Team

Hornady Manufacturing® is offering a unique opportunity to bid on a rare Zombie Max™ Ammo Plant in an online auction, with all proceeds benefiting the USA Shooting Team competing in the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London.

The features of this reloader are identical to the brand new Hornady® Lock-N-Load® Ammo Plant, with one key difference. The Zombie Max™ version has been designed to complement Hornady’s limited-time Zombie Max™

Unique Zombie Max Ammo Plant from Hornady.

ammunition. Its green paint and “zombified” graphics were crafted by Hornady® Tool Division workers. They created these presses as a surprise for the company’s President and Vice President, Steve and Jason Hornady, as a way to build excitement for the release of the Zombie Max™ line. The Hornadys are offering one for public auction, with all proceeds supporting the USA Shooting team. Details about the tool’s features and technical abilities can be found on the Hornady® website at http://www.hornady.com/store/Lock-N-Load-Ammo-Plant-110-VT.

The online auction is underway at GunBroker.com from April 13 through April 29, 2012. Bidders can also get a first hand look at the Zombie Max™ Ammo Plant in the Hornady® booth #1831 at the NRA Show, April 13-15, 2012, in St. Louis, Missouri. The winning bidder will be notified immediately after the auction closes.

USA Shooting is a 501c3 non-profit corporation chartered by the United States Olympic Committee as the National Governing Body for the sport of shooting. Partially funded by the U.S. Olympic Committee, USA Shooting relies on dues, donations, events, and corporate partnerships to promote the development of the U.S. Shooting Team. For more information, visit the USA Shooting website.

 

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Guest Blog@ Ammoland.com

Recently Fred was a guest blogger for Ammoland.com You can check out his post here:


http://www.ammoland.com/2011/08/24/think-don%E2%80%99t-like-wildcat-cartridges/

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Junk Science and Lead Bullets

Below is an Associated Press story about lead in ammunition.  Note that no scientist is going on record in this article and the there is no evidence presented.  Just could be or maybe.

Since the Jackson area is part of the Yellowstone caldera there are large amounts of heavy metals and minerals found in the area.  Isn’t it more likely that the lead found in the blood of animals in the area comes from their diet.  What happened to you are what you eat?  The predators and scavengers of the area feed on the animals of the area and drink the same water.  Why would they not have heavier levels of lead in their blood.

Being higher on the food chain mean predators and scavengers food sources have already concentrated environmental metals and contaminates in their tissue.  So it is easy to see why such predator and scavengers have more lead in their blood.  I hate junk science, and worst of all, tax payers probably paid for these “scientists” to be out there pushing their personal agendas.

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Researchers say the distribution of nonlead ammunition to hunters in Jackson Hole is likely helping prevent lead poisoning of ravens, eagles and other scavengers.

This is the second year researchers have tried to gauge the impacts of hunters using lead-free ammunition on the levels of lead found in the blood of big-game scavengers.

Researchers distributed nonlead ammunition to some 100 hunters who had 2010 permits for the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park.

Biologists then captured ravens and eagles and measured the level of lead in the birds.

Previous research has shown that lead in ravens and eagles rise during hunting season and then drop off after hunting season ends.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide says researchers plan to hand out more lead-free ammunition next hunting season.

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New Print Edition of the Hawk Reloading Manual!

Hawk Cartridges LogoYears ago I put together a reloading manual for Hawk Cartridges.  It has been available in CD from Z-Hat Custom ever since.  Over the years I have added to it and clients have long requested that I produce a print version of the manual.

I have the print edition almost ready to go to the publisher.  I added data for three cartridges that in new for this edition.  The 348 Hawk, 9.3mm Hawk, and the 411 Express.  Some pressure data is added as well for many of the cartridges.

Another important addition will be the Chamber dimensions.  In the past they have been held by reamer makers.  It has come to my attention recently that some of the tools being made for Hawk Cartridges have been incorrect in some dimensions.  Since we provide ammo and formed brass it is important to clear up these errors.

New Cartridge Drawings for the Hawk Manual

Drawings for the manual will include dimensions and case capacity.

Several of the Hawk line of cartridge appeared in the 11th edition of “Cartridges of the World”.    RCBS has been making dies for all of the Hawk line for many years.

Articles in the manual include material for several different authors who have used and tested Hawk rifles in the field.  It looks like the print edition of the manual will run 170 pages or more.

The information for the 411 Hawk is greatly expanded to include a powder profile the suggest not only the best powders to use, but some to stay away from for the 411.  In addition there is a article about lead bullet loads for the 411 that will save you a ton of experimenting and head you toward the best results right from the start.

I will announce the publication date right here as soon as I know for sure.

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