Monthly Archives: July 2012

Indiana Allows Longer Cartridges

A few years back the Department of Natural Resources in Indian decided to allow the use of rifles of limited size.  Size of cartridge that is.

Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of .357-inch diameter or larger; have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches; and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, 357 Maximum, .38-.40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-.40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W.  Of course certain wildcats fit this definition as well, i.e. 350 Indy (35 WSSM) and others.

Starting with the hunting season in 2012 the maximum rifle cartridge length that can be used in the firearm season has been extended to 1.8 inches. This means that the .460 Smith & Wesson, .450 Bushmaster, and .50 Beowulf will be legal to use during the deer firearms season.

The 358 Hoosier  is a shortened 358 Winchester case that meets the new limits and is drawing a lot of interest. The 358 IDC also known as the 350 Indy is the 25 WSSM necked up to 35 caliber, this is a great use for WSSM guns that nobody seems to like.  UPDATE: These last two have now been redesigned to meet the change in the rules, both are now available in 1.80″ versions.  The Hoosier is designated 358 Hoosier 1.8″ and the 1.6″ versions still exists.  The longer version of the IDC is designated the “358 IDC II”.

If you want to read the complete information check these links.

http://www.eregulations.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/12INHD-FINAL-LR.pdf

http://www.eregulations.com/indiana/hunting/pageFlip/

http://ajbrownarms.com/articles/announcing-the-358-hoosier/

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Fred Zeglin Wins Recognition for Writing

Rocky Mountain Outdoor Writers and Photographers (RMOWP) has released the results of their 2012 writing contest.  Fred Zeglin received four awards in this years competition for his work in print, web, and podcasting.

 

 

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280 Ackley Improved Emperical Headspace Test

Top is SAAMI or Nosler type headspace gauge for 280 AI. Bottom is the “Traditional” headspace gauge for the 280 Ackley Improved, note the difference between the shoulder angles.

These Chamber gauges were made using the headspace gauges as marked. The purpose being that we can visually see the difference and measure any difference when the gauges are swapped, or ammunition is checked.

Here the gauges have been swapped to the incorrect chambers. NOTE: no difference in headspace, both gauges are flush with the base of the chamber gauge.

According to the argument, The case in the “Traditional” chamber should be .014″ too deep in the chamber. As with the gauges headspace is zero.

The discussion of headspace and the 280 Ackley Improved has been going on far too long.  Recently I decided to perform a test that would demonstrate the differences or similarities between the SAAMI (Nosler) gauge and the “Traditional” Ackley gauge.

First you can see that the shoulder angle is not the same.  The SAAMI gauge is 40 degrees like the factory brass and ammunition.  The Traditional gauge is 17 degree 30 minute just like the original 280 Remington gauge and factory 280 Remington ammunition or brass.

The Chamber gauges pictured below were both made with the exact same 280 AI reamer.  The only difference between the SAAMI and the Traditional chambers are the headspace gauges, all other measurements are identical.

Each chamber gauge was stamped with the name of the gauge used to headspace it.  The headspace was set to zero, or flush with the flat base of the gauge.

Once I had both chambers cut I swapped the gauges expecting to see some obvious disparity as the reamer makers have been emphatic that there is a difference.  However, there was no difference between the two chambers.

How could that be?

Well, when you check the drawings from SAAMI and the Traditional drawings for the Ackley Improved you find that indeed there is a numerical difference between the two drawings of .014″.  The problem stems from reamer makers applying a datum line to the Traditional Ackley drawing at the .375″ diameter on the shoulder, this is not where the datum line is on a traditional Ackley.

The drawing calls for a 40 degree shoulder, but the datum measurement is based on the traditional 17 degree gauge.  In other words the systems of measuring are mixed.  Ackley used the junction of the neck and shoulder to headspace his Improved chamber, not the datum line along the shoulder.

Hence we end up with a headspace length of 2.1542″ on the Traditional drawing.  I measured this length on my cutaway chamber and guess what, that is the length to the junction of the neck and shoulder.  Thus headspace matches the drawings correctly.

The 40 degree SAAMI gauges are made to the industry standard, datum line method.  So the drawings are correct, the datum line is at the .375″ diameter along the shoulder.  The length called out for this gauge is 2.140″, which appears to be .014″ shorter than the Traditional design.

What we have is two different methods of measurement.  However they achieve the exact same result.  Seeing is believing.

With all that said, for liability reasons I would still use the gauge the client asks for.  It’s easier than explaining all this over and over again.

The obvious question will come up, “But I am still having trouble with headspace, so the Nosler brass must be wrong?”  The answer is; More than likely a lazy or inexperienced gunsmith did not use a gauge to set headspace, but rather used brass.  The Nosler brass should work in a “Traditioinal” chamber if the headspace was set between a go and no-go as prescribed by P.O. Ackley and every reamer maker that sells these tools.

Here are some additional source of information on this subject:

http://gunsmithingradio.com/2012/08/16/interview-with-andy-huebschmann-episode-12/

Book has recently been published, “P.O. Ackley, America’s Gunsmith”

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Filed under accuracy, ammo, brass, Firearms, Gunsmithing, How To, wildcat

Miller Precision Arms, Guardian, 300 Winchester Magnum AR

Brandon Miller of MPA has been a busy guy.  He has his 300 Win. Mag. on an AR platform ready to offer to the public.  Miller Precision announced this new rifle on July 4th, 2012 in celebration of freedom.  At the time of this writing they are the only company that has a functioning rifle of this type.  Best of all the MPA rifle is an AR, this means not training with a new system.    This rifle is a natural for military use, or what a great way to play the High Power game, F class anyone?

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